Presenters

NameCountryFocusBioTopic
Wilma DerksenCanadaAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Since the abduction and murder of her daughter Candace in 1984, Wilma Derksen has won numerous awards, such as the Canadian Criminal Justice Association Restorative Justice Award, the Ron Wiebe Restorative Justice Award, the Nellie Award and the Order of Manitoba. It was her dream of a safe place for all victims that inspired Candace House in Winnipeg, ManitobaI've just come out with a new book in which I tell my story. The title is "Dispelling the Clouds, a desperate social experiment." The book explores the victim/offender trauma bond.

Backcover description of the book.
"Faced with the blunt reality of the murder of her daughter and the haunting presence of an overwhelming reptilian emotion, Wilma Derksen dares to choose a counter-intuitive way of dealing with it all. When her controversial choice hits the headlines, she is forced to defend it, redefine it, explore it, experiment with it, live it, fight with it and eventually accept it. Showing exceptional vulnerability through the use of personal story, Wilma draws us into this long, treacherous journey that took her into the Big House, the Court House, the Halfway House, God’s House, Government House and eventually the Candace House. In the end, this unlikely experiment results in the most unexpected findings."
Marit de HaanBelgiumVictim support
Academic
Other (add details below
Marit de Haan is a PhD researcher at the Human Rights Centre of Ghent University (Belgium). She conducts research on the perceptions and needs of justice of the victims of the Chilean military dictatorship. Her main areas of interest are restorative justice, transitional justice and victimology.

Habib Nassar is the director of Policy and Research at Impunity Watch. He has extensive experience in working with victim groups and is a leading expert on justice and accountability in Syria.
Who do we talk about when we talk about victims? And shouldn't we be talking with them instead?

The Justice Visions podcast focusses on victim participation in transitional justice. In its episode on victimization, you will learn more about the label of victim, the issues of re-traumatization and tertiary victimization, how to work with victims in research and the impact this might have on the researcher.

You will hear the views of the following experts:
Habib Nassar (Director of Policy and Research at Impunity Watch)
Rudina Jasini (Oxford-trained legal scholar and lawyer)
Simon Green (Reader at Hull University)
Simon Robins (Research Fellow at the University of York)

During the Q&A (with Habib Nassar and Marit de Haan) we are happy to answer any questions and engage in a further discussion on what restorative justice could mean for victims of large scale human rights violations.
Kerrie SellenAustraliaAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Schools
I am the director of Restorative Journeys and work in a range of schools, communities and workplaces implementing RP. I believe strongly in a explicit practice frame work. I achieved Australia's 6th best workplace culture bu embedding RP into everything we did. I developed the 4 pillars of RP.RJ have been working with a range of schools and explicitly teaching the young people, families and teachers how to use a restorative practice framework to build and sustain healthy relationships and deal with conflict and harm when it occurs. This is an explicit and proactive approach to support teachers to build a connected community in their classrooms and have everyone using a consistent explicit framework and shared language. We have schools now reporting that young people are resolving their own conflict and harm and not relying on the teachers to have to be the facilitators of this all the time. When they do there is a consistent language and understanding. We have done several whole of school community training's and offered training to all the young people, teachers and staff team and to the families and broader community.
Kirsten WilsonUnited StatesAdult justice and prisons
Authors & Creative
Community justice
Motus Theater (Colorado, U.S.A.) creates original theater to facilitate dialogue on critical issues of our time. We work with people on the frontlines of violence in America to create autobiographical monologues. We then partner with prominent Americans and law enforcement to stand in the shoes of Motus monologists by reading aloud their stories on stage and in podcast formats to increase awareness, shift attitudes, and inspire action towards a more equitable and just country.JustUs: Stories from the Frontlines of the Criminal Justice System Motus Theater worked with formerly incarcerated leaders to develop autobiographical monologues about the criminality and injustice within the criminal justice system. Monologues cover themes as diverse as racial profiling, inequity in the bond/bail system, human rights abuses in prison, the criminalization of substances abusers, and the systemic racism and poverty that pushes young people into illicit economies because they are shut out of legal opportunities. Watch an excerpt of this powerful performance from the most recent U.S. National Association of Community and Restorative Justice conference in which JustUs monologists read their own stories and law enforcement leaders step into their shoes by reading aloud JustUs stories. The formerly incarcerated leaders in JustUs ask law enforcement to sit in a circle with them and hear the harm they experienced so justice can be restored to the criminal justice system itself.
Mugdha SukhramaniIndiaAdult justice and prisons
Legal and judicial
I am a final year law student at Christ (Deemed to be University), Bangalore, India. I am also working as a Social Worker and Documentation Associate at Counsel to Secure Justice, Delhi. My interest areas include criminology and criminal justice, and I intend to pursue my masters in the same. I have done varied socio-legal internships in the area, and have been closely associated with research on prison systems and sentencing policies. I have also supported advocacy initiatives.Amidst Suspicions and Barbed Wires: Employability of RJ in Prisons Restorative justice is seldom talked about within prisons that follow the contradictory strategies of punishment and rehabilitation. Prisons are viewed as protective mechanisms 'for' the society, ironically so in exclusion of the persons in confinement. The purpose of rehabilitation has also failed without consideration being accorded to the making of the individual. Prisons need recognition as a community unto themselves where restorative justice values are sufficiently owned by the parties. The intoxicating toughness that prisons bring with themselves refuses to give inmates the option of being vulnerable. A semblance of reality and inculcation of core values of being ‘good’ could become a part of the prison system by employing RJ. Healing and listening circles can become a way of life for inmates who otherwise feel excluded from the society at large, to heal from the harm, and possibly reduce re-criminalization.
Ram TiwariNepalSexual offences
Victim support
Community justice
Ram Tiwari is the Founder Chair of Nepal Forum for Restorative justice. He has been involved in introducing Nepal's maiden restorative justice projects, and has been developing restorative justice programs in post-conflict settings, sexual and gender-based violence, juvenile justice and trafficking in persons.In my presentation, I will discuss the state of restorative justice in Nepal and South Asia and how its linkage with the local community justice mechanisms is going to be a double-edge sword. I will discuss how on the one hand, such linkages give restorative justice much-needed entry-points and leeways for a bigger change, while on the other hand, such linkages might just close the need for a move to, and a movement of, restorative justice in Nepal and the region.
Dr Jane BolithoAustraliaAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Sexual offences
I am an academic at UNSW Sydney with a restorative practices research focus. Originally trained as a psychologist, I have government experience in the evaluation of justice programs and am also an accredited mediator. This year I've enjoyed the challenge of teaching my RJ course online, the advocacy and education work I'm doing with the Cicada Project (see presentation) and writing a new paper on RJ sexual violence data based on a completed empirical project on post-sentencing RJ in NSW.See Thea Deakin-Greenwood. We will be discussing The Cicada Project.
Leslie de MeullesCanadaVictim support
Legal and judicial
Community justice
My name is Leslie de Meulles. I am a sole practitioner operating my own practice (LDM Law) in Whitehorse, Yukon, working primarily with self-governing First Nations on matters related to modern treaty implementation. My work focuses on creating the laws, institutions and governance practices that revitalize traditional and restorative practices and promote strong Indigenous nations. My work also includes negotiating justice agreements that would see full control devolved to Indigenous Nations in all aspects of the administration of justice.My presentation would focus on the work I have done with Indigenous nations on developing Indigenous laws and institutions that incorporate restorative and Indigenous practices and that avoid re-creating colonial justice and legal institutions that are adversarial and litigation-focused. Specifically, I would discuss this work in the context of modern treaty First Nations in the Yukon and how/whether the modern treaty is enabling the revitalization of restorative and traditional practices. I would provide a presentation but would also want to encourage a group discussion to promote knowledge-sharing and collaboration among participants.
Jonathan ClaytonSouth AfricaAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Victim support
I'm Presenting the Restorative Justice and Victim Offender Dialogue Process in Correctional Facilities over the last 21 years. Our incarcerated people committed extremely evil and brutal crimes. Many serve a life sentence. Our 70 hour process with a group of 28 offenders at a time is extremely helpful in terms of Responsibility, The truth, remorse, accountability regarding the impact of the crime on victims and the community. Restorative Justice is need for incarcerated people. They meet with their real victims/families.Dr. David Lykken) a psychologist refers to criminal behaviour because of por parenting, absent father, no loving father figures as positive role models and inadequate mothers. The behaviour for such people are Aggressiveness, Fearlessness and Sensation Seeking. 90% of our offenders comes out of such situations therefore their crime becomes extremely evil.I want to share how we journey with them for 70 hours but we starts with their childhood roots and reasons for the criminal behaviour although there is no excuse for crime. When they understand their own emotional pain, we experienced how they understand the pain of the victims. The second day (6 hours) we invites victims of crime to come and share their ordeal even years after the crime. Some of the victims will be part of the conference and they can share or I can record one minutes clips of their experience. We also call their families.
Sri Ram TimilsinaNepalYouth justice
Schools
Sri Ram Timilsina , Nonviolent Communication(NVC) Practitioner, Local Professional for Civil Peace Service Program/ Propublic from Nepal, living and sharing NVC in schools and communities for connection, collaboration, healing, restoration, peace and justice."Out of Wrong doing and Right doing there is a field, and I will meet you there" - Rumi
"All human actions are performed to fulfill certain Needs" - Marshall B. Rosenberg
I will present about my Personal observations and experiences around Coloring Nepal with Nonviolent Communication(NVC) and creating a culture of Peace with Justice in Schools and Communities of Nepal for last 10 years. Attendees will have a wide understanding of the widely used restorative practices in Nepalese schools and communities like seeing human and being human; the attitude, Empathy, Distinction of Needs and Wants / Strategies, participation, mediation and Dialogue which has helped in creating new support systems / Restorative Circles, Perform Restorative Dialogues and redesign the existing structures (retributive to restorative practise / Justice) applying the IAA Model for creating connection, collaboration, peace and happiness with justice.
Konina MandalIndiaAdult justice and prisons
Academic
Konina Mandal is an Assistant Lecturer at Jindal Global Law School, O.P Jindal Global University, India. Her research interests include criminology and criminal justice, criminal laws and corrections. She will be co-presenting with Anwesha Panigrahi, Assistant Professor at ICFAI Law School,Hyderabad, India.Prima facie reformative, the reality of our criminal justice system still bears the undertones of retribution, repression, and oppression. Liberal views suggest that the criminal justice system should cease to be an epitome of outrage and vengeance. Although the restorative justice approach has been deliberated upon in the Indian setting trying to usher in virtues of compassion, forgiveness, and healing, it is yet to leave a memorable mark. Echoed by proponents of restorative justice, who offer a victim-centric solution to primarily victim justice, the need of the changing times is the consideration of not just restorative but also transformative justice alternatives in order to bring the ‘less eligible’ offender into the limelight. Drawing from Pepinsky and Quinney’s peace-making criminology and Morris’ idea of transformative justice, we seek to explore along with the possibilities, feasibility and promises of restorative justice, the idea and concept of transformation and transformative justice.
Anwesha PanigrahiIndiaAcademicAnwesha Panigrahi is presently positioned as an Assistant Professor at ICFAI Law School, Hyderabad, India. She has an LLM in Criminal Justice, Family and Social Welfare. Her research interests include criminal justice, prison jurisprudence and prison laws, corrections, criminal laws and procedure. She will be co-presenting with Ms. Konina Mandal.Prima facie reformative, the reality of our criminal justice system still bears the undertones of retribution, repression, and oppression. Liberal views suggest that the criminal justice system should cease to be an epitome of outrage and vengeance. Although the restorative justice approach has been deliberated upon in the Indian setting trying to usher in virtues of compassion, forgiveness, and healing, it is yet to leave a memorable mark. Echoed by proponents of restorative justice, who offer a victim-centric solution to primarily victim justice, the need of the changing times is the consideration of not just restorative but also transformative justice alternatives in order to bring the ‘less eligible’ offender into the limelight. Drawing from Pepinsky and Quinney’s peace-making criminology and Morris’ idea of transformative justice, we seek to explore along with the possibilities, feasibility and promises of restorative justice, the idea and concept of transformation and transformative justice.
Dr Terry SavageSwitzerlandVictim support
Academic
Extremism
Dr Terry Savage is a researcher with the University of Leuven, in Belgium; an educator specializing in online and blended learning options; and a practitioner who worked as the UN’s Reparations Policy Advisor in Nepal and is currently cooperating with the German aid agency, GIZ, and Civil Peace Service in northern Iraq.How can restorative justice practitioners work with the day-to-day conflicts that ensue from the devastation caused by acts of gross human rights violation? Such acts devastate the dignity, energies and felt preciousness of a human life – making daily struggles harder and defying victims’ ability to voice their suffering and regain agency. The plight of women in northern Iraq returning after abduction and sexualized enslavement under Daesh offers a prism through the presentation explores options that are decent, productive and potentially restorative and transformative. The presentation introduces a method of Elicitive Action Research for research with victims – research that co-creates, with victims, a platform for exploring present needs and interests resulting from the violational episode, combined with the practice of ensuring victims’ voices in driving, designing and delivering initiatives that can transform present conflicts and provide a measure of satisfaction - recognition of their legitimate needs for justice –
Bonnie WepplerCanadaCommunity justiceBonnie Weppler is the Executive Director of the Church Council on Justice and Corrections (CCJC) in Ottawa, Canada. CCJC's mandate is to promote education on restorative justice and to sponsor initiatives to build healthier and safer communities. Bonnie holds an MA degree from Saint Paul University Ottawa. Prior to moving to Ottawa, Bonnie lived and worked, for over a decade, in three locations in Papua New Guinea. Bonnie lives with her 14 year old pitbull mix dog.During National Restorative Justice Week 2005, 40 victims and offenders came together to create the Justice Storytelling Quilt, a restorative justice tool. The victims and offenders met together in two medium security federal jails in Quebec. Each victim and offender created a quilt block; the blocks are made of different materials but represent some part of the victim's/offender's story. Participants can listen to the victims and offenders as they share their stories.

The Quilt has travelled across Canada to different events and fifteen years later, the Justice Storytelling Quilt has been digitalized so that it can reach a broader audience.
Tomas HardimanIrelandSexual offencesProducer of ‘The Meeting’ , a feature film based on a true story of Restorative Justice in Ireland.The 95-minute feature film ‘The Meeting’
Janine CarrollUnited KingdomYouth justiceJanine Carroll is Director of Restorative Now, a training and culture-change organisation, focusing upon the implementation of sustainable restorative practice across a variety of settings. Restorative Now works internationally across Europe, South East Asia and Australasia, within the criminal justice, education, police, social work, housing and community agency sectors. Janine Carroll has 30 years’ experience in the restorative practice field, with accredited Trainer and Practitioner status with the Restorative Justice Council UK, and the European Forum for Restorative Justice.Restorative Practice Clinics between Young People and their Significant Adult This presentation focus is a project initiative undertaken within two Local Authority Youth Offending Services in London UK, and represents a commitment to ensuring that the first interaction between the Young People and the Youth Offending Service is a Restorative conversation between the Young Person and their ‘Significant Adult’. This application represents an innovative use of Restorative Practice, one that is set apart from a more common reference to individual harm caused and remedy sought. The initiative creates a safe space for open conversations between the caregiver and child using a restorative approach. They discuss the impact of the recent offence event upon their relationship, and the emotional impact upon each of them. Evaluative data indicates a positive impact on both the quality of that relationship and the emotional wellbeing of the Young Person. Over 150 young people were included.
Thea Deakin-GreenwoodAustraliaYouth justice
Sexual offences
Victim support
I am a community lawyer in Australia working mainly with survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence, in both community settings and in connection to the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Assault. I am working with Dr Jane Bolitho to develop a community-based RJ response to sexual violence. In 2019 I was awarded Churchill Fellowship to investigate victim-oriented restorative justice practices around the world.The service I work for, Elizabeth Evatt Community Legal Centre is working with Dr Jane Bolitho, UNSW https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/dr-jane-bolitho to develop "The Cicada Project" which is a survivor-oriented restorative justice process for sexual assault and intimate partner violence. We work in collaboration with local and international partners on this work and are developing programs for both young people and adults in a co-design process with local communities and stakeholders. Our work responds to the limits of the criminal legal system to respond appropriately to victims IPV and sexual violence and our presentation would focus on restorative justice as an appropriate and important response to these harms. We are developing this work in partnership with services that work with survivors as well with people who have harmed. This work builds on the foundations of good practice developed by RESTORE Arizona and Project Restore, New Zealand. Our webpage is here: www/eeclc.org.au/cicada-project
Prof. Grazia MannozziItalyAdult justice and prisons
Legal and judicial
Academic
Presenters: Grazia Mannozzi: full professor of Criminal law and Restorative Justice at University of Insubria (Italy); director of Restorative Justice and Mediation Study Centre (CeSGReM); former Chair of the EFRJ Working Group on Restorative City. Gian Luigi Lepri: Research fellow on Restorative Justice programme. Current Chair of the EFRJ Working Group on Restorative City. Chiara Perini: associate professor of Criminal law and Restorative Justice at University of Insubria (Italy).A dialogue on “restorative cities” in an ideal passing of the baton between the first Chair of the EFRJ Working Group on Restorative Cities and the current one. The conversation focuses on: a) the conceptual transition from restorative justice theory to the elaboration of the idea of “restorative cities”; b) the reasons for the “restorative cities” issue has become a pivotal theme in the action of the EFRJ and has led to the foundation of a Working Group (which has brought together experts from different disciplines and restorative cities realities). After presenting the main examples of “restorative cities” that have developed concretely in Europe, the speakers will try to apply the SWOT Analysis to the “restorative cities” projects, evaluating their Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. The goal is to contribute to the work planning of the EFRJ Working Group and all those involved in promoting “restorative cities”.
Prerna BaruaIndiaSexual offences
Academic
Community justice
My name is Prerna and I am currently a Graduate Student at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding at Eastern Mennonite University, pursuing a Master’s degree in Conflict Transformation. I also work as a Graduate research assistant for the Zehr Institute of RJ. Currently, I'm interning with the Ahimsa Collective and the Counsel to Secure Justice.The question that this paper addresses is whether historical harms can be “corrected” or “transformed” through Restorative Justice mechanisms for those who did not survive the harms that they faced. Although theories of Transitional Justice deal with addressing the issues of the historical harms in transitional societies through ideas such as “memorializing and remembrance projects”, these ideas have not specifically addressed the question of how individual victims receive justice. The narratives of the lives of individuals who did not survive the harm that they faced could be a powerful tool in order to bring justice to them. This paper contends that in order to combat the idea of “ethical loneliness” for the victims, the society in general, and those who caused harm in particular have a moral responsibility to ensure remembrance based justice.
Malini LaxminarayanBelgiumHate crimesMalini Laxminarayan is a project officer at the European Forum for Restorative Justice in Belgium. She has worked on many projects related to (access to) restorative justice, victim rights, empowerment of sexual violence victims and transitional justice. Currently Malini is working on the project LetsGoByTalking: Protecting and defending the rights of victims of anti-LGBT hate crimes - Innovative paths through restorative justice.The potential positive effects of restorative justice are undeniable. What is lacking, however, is a more solid understanding of the types of crime where restorative justice may be most impactful. While scholars have given quite some attention to controversial themes such as sexual violence and domestic violence, research understanding the experiences of anti-LGBT hate crime victims within the restorative justice discipline is lacking. This presentation will present preliminary findings from the Lets Go By Talking project (funded by the European Union´s Justice Programme 2014-2020), made up of 6 partners and coordinated by the University of Barcelona, which aims to better understand how to engage this group of victims in finding restorative means for conflict resolution. Their unique experience, largely due to the fact that the crime is an attack on their identity, requires a specific approach and more detailed understanding of how best to apply restorative justice.
Prof. Don John OmaleNIGERIAAdult justice and prisons
Academic
Extremism
Don John O. Omale PhD is a British Chevening Scholar of Criminology; and Professor of Criminology at the Federal University Wukari Taraba State, Nigeria. He holds BSc Psychology (University of Nigeria, Nsukka), MSc Criminology (University of Leicester, UK) and PhD Criminology with specialism in Restorative Justice & Victimology at the Centre for Community and Criminal Justice, De-Montfort University Leicester, England, UK. He is an Advisory Board Member to Restorative Justice International, USA; and UNODC Expert on Restorative Justice.RESTORATIVE JUSTICE OPPORTUNITIES IN NIGERIA The impact of Restorative Justice as a global and humanizing justice cannot be overemphasized. In Nigeria, the Nigerian Correctional Service Act,2019 provides opportunity for mainstreaming restorative justice in the Nigerian Correctional Service. Similarly, the process for the reintegration of about 983 repentant violent extremists into the society after their de-radicalization and rehabilitation at the Nigerian military's "Operation Safe Corridor" in Gombe, northeastern Nigeria has been planned by the Nigerian Government. Though there are objections from some victims of Boko Haram terrorism on this policy of government, this paper will showcase restorative justice opportunities emerging in Nigeria for possible international partnerships/collaborations.
Annegrete JohansonEstoniaVictim supportI am from Estonia. I work as service manager in Victim support and my responsibility is RJ and mediation. One field is to develope system of RJ volunteers. I have studied social work, social pedagogy and child care. Over 14 years I have worked with youth at risk in different fields and gave lecture in the University.In this session there will be a overview of developing RJ in Estonia in last years. Next to developing a system of volunteers, the time of Covid-19 gave opportunity to develope RP more and look outside the box. In Covid-19 time there were restorative discussion-circles online and after restrictions there were restorative discussion-circles in real life. In the presentation there will be storytellings of people who had take part of RP.
Jo BerryUnited KingdomExtremism
Other (add details below
I founded a charity, 'Building Bridges for Peace' in 2009 as a response to my Father being killed in a terrorist attack in 1984 in the UK. I am an international speaker and facilitator to create a peaceful restorative culture in the world. I share my story of becoming friends with the ex IRA combatant who planted the bomb. I am a restorative justice facilitator and work with young people, empowering them to be positive change-makers.The presentation will be a sharing of my story of meeting Patrick Magee, the ex IRA combatant who planted a bomb which killed my Dad. I organised the meeting in 2000 and I will share why it was so important for my healing and how it then turned into 20 years of us working together. I will look at the role of betrayal, how I stayed away from revenge, my inner impulse to heal, the challenges of this work, the insights and how this had led me to contributing around the world in changing how we perceive our 'other'. I will share some of the stories of those I work with and how we can all give up blame and not demonise each other, changing the judgement, 'I am right you are wrong', to- we all have a story and deserve to be heard with dignity and respect.
talma shultzUnited StatesSchools
Academic
Talma developed and facilitated education programs in non-profit and government organizations for 25 years. She integrates neuroscience, psychology, pedagogy and the arts grounded in equity and inclusion. She has led leadership workshops with youth and developed curricula integrating the arts and restorative practices including circles in schools. Co-presenter Penny S. Bryan led graduate leadership programs at Chapman University for 25 years. Currently she edited two books on Arts Based research and has led and participated in circles for 8 years.When no words will do - Arts integration into circle.
“If all meanings could adequately be expressed in words, the arts of music or painting would not exist.” John Dewey (1934). In circle we come together respectfully to listen and speak our truth. We do this largely through discursive language. There are however, many ways of knowing and multiple languages for expressing thoughts and feelings. They may surface stories not yet heard by people not yet seen. Our focus is on the creative arts as ways of knowing and being in community through circle. The arc of choices is only limited by our imaginations. The creative arts can be accessed during any part of the circle practice. We will open with music and share a visual art so that each participant has their own embodied experience. We will discuss how each piece might be realized during circle.
Jee Aei LeeAustriaOther (add details belowMs.Jee Aei (Jamie) Lee is a Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice Officer at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, where she focuses on promoting restorative justice in criminal matters and the effective use of alternatives to imprisonment. Prior to the UN, she represented victims of domestic violence and human trafficking in criminal, immigration and family law proceedings as an attorney at Sanctuary for Families, the largest non-profit organization in New York City serving such clients.The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has recently updated its Handbook on Restorative Justice Programmes, which was initially published in 2006. As the newest addition to UNODC's Criminal Justice Handbook Series, the Second Edition of this Handbook offers a great wealth of updated information on various developments in restorative justice around the world. It can be used by all actors in criminal justice system and those working in criminal justice reform, both as a reference document and a training tool.

I invite you to listen in if you are interested in hearing about what has been done internationally towards promoting the use of restorative justice in criminal matters.
Moana EmettNew ZealandSchoolsMoana Emett is the Professional Leader of a five year project at the University of Waikato, funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Education, to introduce restorative practices to over 300 schools (Early Childhood, Primary, Middle and Secondary Schools) in New Zealand under the Positive Behaviour for Learning Restorative Practices project (PB4L RP). Moana works with a highly experienced team leading the implementation of RP in growing and strengthening communities of learning including staff, students and whānau (families).Restorative practice is a relational and inclusive approach to school life grounded in beliefs about equality, dignity, mana and the potential of all people. The PB4L RP model focuses on building, maintaining, sustaining and growing positive relationships across the school community and offers school staff best-practice tools and techniques to restore relationships when things go wrong or issues arise. Restorative practice contributes to creating safe and peaceful communities that support student engagement and wellbeing. This workshop will provide an overview of the work being implemented in over 300 New Zealand schools in restorative practice.

Moana and her team will share how they work with schools to grow capability and capacity and support school communities to embed relational and restorative practice in practical ways, working with school boards, leadership teams, lead coaches, staff, students and whānau, regionally, nationally and online.
Gavin ZhouNew ZealandOther (add details belowI am the Communications Officer for Restorative Practices Aotearoa in New Zealand. I will be co-presenting with Annie Pinchen. She is a Researcher & Special Projects Manager for Restorative Practices Aotearoa.This presentation is about our introduction to RJ. Annie Pinchen came to Restorative Practices Aotearoa (RPA) with a Sociology background and an awareness of the issues RJ addresses. Gavin Zhou came to RJ as a law student. For Gavin, RJ had always existed in the periphery. From differing ideological backgrounds both Annie and Gavin have developed an enduring respect for the philosophy. They have developed a deeper appreciation and understanding of the work that takes place in communities. There is a transformational power in RJ practice. They wanted to share their journey's because of the transformations in their own lives.
James WallerAustraliaSexual offences
Academic
Authors & Creative
My main area of expertise arises from years of learned personal experience of the Australian judicial system and the devastating fallout from that which has generated a passion for faith based restorative Justice. I have worked with people involved with Victims Of Child Abuse Laws and with the present generation of stolen children. I have conducted immense research and written 20 books over the last two decades into what I have denominated grace-based or relational and restorative Justice.A brief biographical background that fired my passion for compassionate and restorative justice spelling out my unique contribution in this field. I look at the crucial cosmic catalyst of the unique atonement for crimes of fallen humanity, as furnishing the only verifiable ADEQUATE ontological, epistemonological, anthropological, soteriological and agathological foundation for a truely comprehensive Redemptive and Relational TRANSFORMATIVE Restorative Justice, and so constituting the only PROVEN divine-human sociological SHALOMIC and salugenic justice.
Claudia ChristenSwitzerlandAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Academic
Claudia Christen-Schneider holds an MSc in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Portsmouth, in England, and studied Restorative Justice at SFU in Canada. She’s also a certified mediator and the founder and president of the Swiss RJ Forum. She’s very active in promoting restorative justice in Switzerland and also involved in EFRJ’s values & standards committee.Restorative Dialogues after serious crimes - What are restorative group dialogues? Is it worth implementing these? What benefits can victims and offenders derive from meeting in a group with other victims and offenders of similar offences? Does it bring any benefit at all? The participants in these groups are mostly victims and offenders of serious crimes, but they do not know each other. They meet over several weeks and exchange their experiences, tell their stories and ask each other questions. This presentation is part of the EFRJ presentations and introduces a Swiss project that has been implemented in prisons for several years. One of the main goals of this approach was to broaden the access to restorative justice services for victims and offender who cannot meet their direct counterpart.
Tom ShawUnited KingdomSchools
Academic
My current role includes being a teacher, researcher and senior leader. I lead on developing character, restorative approaches and peace education at Carr Manor Community School in Leeds, UK. In addition I have recently been part of developing the www.restoreourschools.com project and also work with others schools in the UK to develop their relational and restorative practice.Examples of embedded whole school restorative practice are not as common as they should. The model at Carr Manor Community School began 14 years ago with a commitment to zero permanent exclusions and to build community by creating circles of the smallest possible unit of children using all the adults in the organisation. This became an example of investing in peace building that delivers the best person-centred practices. 8 years ago restorative practices helped develop peace-making practices. Alongside this CMCS maintained its commitment to robustly challenge behaviours in order to maintain equal rights, social justice, safety and respect. CMCS now bucks several national and local trends. It has had zero permanent exclusions for 14 years, consistently has the lowest rate of fixed term exclusions in Leeds, high staff retention and the lowest staff absence for stress in Leeds. Pupils self-report higher than city-wide measures on the annual well-being survey.
Dr Angela MonellUnited StatesSchoolsDr. Angela Monell is a native of Prince George’s County Maryland and has resided in Winston Salem, NC for six years. As an educator, her passion for students is evident in her daily work as an Assistant Principal. She believes that when given the opportunity and coaching, students will gain invaluable skills in restoring, rebuilding, and effectively communicating. As she works with students on a secondary level, she believes this is a game-changer for students' social-emotional growth.Co-Presenter with Eric Rainey This dynamic session will detail the mindful and transformative process of moving from the traditional punitive In-School Suspension model to the powerful Restoration Station model. Dr. Angela C. Monell and International Institute of Restorative Practices trained Eric Rainey will lead you through the step by step process of re-imagining space for consequences to space for support and skill-building. Attendees will leave this session with a clear understanding of the educational, social, emotional, and psychological benefits of transitioning to this new model. Attendees will gain valuable insight from a school administrator's perspective, understand the importance of human capital, social-emotional learning, and the many facets of restorative practices that are necessary within the daily wrap-around model to build the capacity of students beyond the classroom.
Dr Anna MatczakNetherlandsAdult justice and prisons
Academic
Community justice
(joint presentation) Dr. Anna Matczak, The Hague University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands Dr. Simone Grigoletto, Adjunct Professor, University of Padua, ItalyAlthough apology and forgiveness are often associated with each other and discussed as powerful elements of a restorative justice process, they are not necessarily interrelated. The aim of this conversation is to delineate the fragilities of these two elements. The notion of apology will be discussed based on empirical findings from Poland, which explore how lay people’s confidence in apology is limited due to cultural and socio-linguistic reasons. Similarly, forgiveness, when taken to be the primary goal to be reached by a restorative process, can generate mistrust and suspicion. This is especially true on the victims’ side who feel to be forced to grant it. Contrary, forgiveness must spring naturally and freely as a by-product of the whole process. As such, this element is good and beneficial when achieved by restorative justice, but it can hardly be considered obligatory.
Dr Simone GrigolettoItalyAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Academic
Simone Grigoletto is a post-doc researcher in Social Innovation at Area Science Park. He is working on a theoretical expansion of the Restorative Approach beyond the Penal Justice system. His further research interests deal with the major issues in contemporary moral philosophy. Other than Restorative Justice, he is the author of publications on supererogation, moral excellence and moral exemplarism.Valuable (yet Fragile) Elements of a Restorative Justice Process A Conversation about Apology and Forgiveness Although apology and forgiveness are often associated with each other and discussed as powerful elements of a restorative justice process, they are not necessarily interrelated. The aim of this conversation is to delineate the fragilities of these two elements. The notion of apology will be discussed based on empirical findings from Poland, which explore how lay people’s confidence in apology is limited. Similarly, forgiveness when taken to be the primary goal to be reached by a Restorative process can generate mistrust and suspicion. This is especially true on the victims’ side who feel to be forced to grant it. Neither apology, nor forgiveness (while being valuable and very powerful tools) can play this role. A fundamental question then arises: what is the goal of Restorative Justice?
Prof. Jennifer LlewellynCanadaAcademic
Other (add details below
Professor of Law, Yogis and Keddy Chair in Human Rights Law and Donald R. Sobey Chair in Restorative Justice at the Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia Canada. Director of the Restorative Research, Innovation and Education Lab and the International Learning Community for a Restorative Approach. Research and work focused in areas of relational theory and a restorative approach, human rights, peacebuilding, truth and reconciliation, justice transformation and restorative communities.This presentation will introduce the vision, approach, and plans for the newly established Restorative Research, Innovation and Education Lab (RRIELab) at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada. The reference to “Lab” signals the goal and commitment to hold time, space, and build the connections needed to create, share and mobilize knowledge for action. The presentation will explore the potential and implications of this “change lab” grounded in the principles of a restorative approach for the growth and development of the feild. The RRIELab will foster and support connections among researchers, practitioners, policymakers and educators locally, nationally and internationally to translate knowledge into action and to learn from innovation and action. The RRIELab will host and be supported by the Restorative Approach International Learning Community (ILC) - an international collaboration among those supporting the vision and implementation of restorative communities, cities and states.
Lee RushUnited StatesSchools
Community justice
Other (add details below
Lee Rush, M.Ed. Lee is the Executive Director of justCommunity, Inc. a non-profit organization based in Quakertown, PA. justCommunity provides training and consultation services to communities, schools and organizations in the area of youth development, community mobilization strategies, student assistance programs and restorative practices. Lee also serves as a consultant with Designed Learning, Inc. and has studied with Designed Learning’s founder Mr. Peter Block to learn facilitative skills using A Small Group methodology. Lee is also a certified trainer forCHANGE THE CONVERSATION- CHANGE THE CULTURE- Based on Peter Block’s work, this presentation introduces critical essential conversations in creating restorative schools and communities. Areas covered are 1) the power of invitation and why choice always trumps mandates, 2) the power of possibility and why we need to stop worshiping at the alter of problems, 3) the power of refusal and to grasp the fact that if we cannot say no to something our yes means nothing and finally 4) the power of gifts and why when we start to focus on gifts rather than deficiencies everything changes. Termed "A Small Group", this methodology has been used across the world in business sectors, restorative educational settings, faith community gatherings and recently in cities exploring the development of "economies of compassion". My approach to building "restorative communities" is centered on the belief that global change occurs at the local level.
Kerri Quinn 2United StatesAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Victim support
Co creator of the Victim Offender Dialogue program in Colorado, lecturer at Univ of Colorado and Creighton University Law School, practitioner with over 1000 cases, Kerri has studied extensively the dynamics of interpersonal conflict and the impact of language and trauma in restorative practices.Uncommon Bond: the unwanted relationship between victims and offenders When a person is harmed by another individual a bond is created. This unwanted bond contributes to anxiety, trauma, and impacts other relationships and possibilities for healing. Victims often want to know "Why did this happen?" and "Why did this happen to me?" This presentation explores the stages of trauma experienced by victims and offenders. Stories are shared from high risk victim offender dialogues (murder and vehicular homicide cases) that successfully broke this bond and allowed for restoration and healing.
Kerri QuinnUnited StatesAdult justice and prisons
Schools
Other (add details below
Trauma Responsive Restorative Communication: Understanding the impact of trauma and language when facilitating restorative practices./U.S./Colorado Restorative JusticeTrauma Responsive Restorative Communication: Understanding the impact of trauma and language when facilitating restorative practices.
Attendees will learn
- trauma responsive skills that can be used in the moment to create
safety and hold space for dialogue
- the dynamics of conflict
- specific language tools facilitators can use to deescalate tension,
encourage accountability and enhance listening
Anna de PaulaBrazilAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Legal and judicial
I am a public prosecutor in Brazil. In Brazilia, where I work, me and my team have developed special attention to crime victims using peace making circles.During the presentation I intend to show how can we help and support crime victims even if without significant amount of financial resource or personal resources. I also want to emphasize the importance of trauma awareness.
Fiona LandonNew ZealandAdult justice and prisons
Sexual offences
RJ facilitator over 20 years experience. Founder and senior facilitator for Project Restore NZ - 15 years plus experience Using RJ processes for sexual harm. Assessor for facilitator accreditation.15 years on - what we have learnt delivering survivor driven restorative justice processes for sexual harm. Project Restore NZ began as an initiative attempting to address survivor concerns regarding their experiences within the criminal justice system. We have been providing RJ processes that met victim survivor’s justice needs both alongside the CJ system and as an alternative for cases. We have addressed a large variety of complex cases of harmful sexual experiences. We have worked with Families/ whanau, children, adult parents of children abused, adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse, adult against adult offending including family harm. We have worked with organisations such as Churches , workplaces and communities using restorative processes to address harm within their communities. We are happy to share what we’d have learnt along the way about what works and what doesn’t.
Urvashi TilakIndiaYouth justice
Sexual offences
Victim support
Urvashi Tilak is the Director of the Restorative Justice Team at Counsel to Secure Justice (CSJ). She oversees the implementation of restorative justice work and practices of the organisation. Kshipra Marathe is the counsellor in the restorative justice team and works with children who cause harm. CSJ, a non-profit based in India, serves and supports individuals and communities that have experienced trauma to ensure they are safe, heard, and receive true healing and justice.Counsel to Secure Justice (CSJ) is one of the few organisations working on developing restorative justice and practices in India. CSJ’s journey with restorative justice began with our work with children who were harmed. As we explored what justice meant to them, we realized that existing legal systems fail to meet their needs. We shifted our lens to explore practices which offer healing to those who are harmed. We started working with children who have caused harm, providing psycho-social support and restorative talking circles in protective and custodial childcare institutions. CSJ now offers restorative justice and reintegration and healing processes for children. So far, CSJ has worked with 250 children in institutions, facilitated two restorative justice processes and held three reintegration processes for children who caused harm. This presentation will discuss CSJ’s journey, the restorative processes facilitated and the learnings and challenges of offering restorative practices within Indian legal system.
Lisa ReaU.S.Adult justice and prisons
Legal and judicial
Other (add details below
victims-driven restorative justice, public policy and restorative justice, wrongful convictions & RJtwo presentations: 1) victims-driven restorative justice & public policy with Lisa Rea and one victim (or victims' team)

2) wrongful convictions and restorative justice: the intersection with Lisa Rea & Jeffrey Deskovic, Deskovic Foundation
Dr Razwana BegumSingaporeAcademic
Environmental justice
Razwana is the Head of the Public Safety and Security Programme at Singapore University of Social Sciences. She has 20 years of experiences working with the criminal justice in Singapore. Razwana has been promoting restorative justice practices in various contexts. Her latest research interest is on the use of restorative justice in commercial organisations.This presentation introduces the potential application of restorative justice in strengthening environmental justice. Referring to a research study that examined ethical business practices of commercial organisations based in Singapore, this presentation recommends a novel approach to the management of corporate crime, specifically environmental crime. The suggestions include changes to leadership strategies and governance framework, with a focus on the impact of commercial activities on various stakeholders. The aim of this presentation is to offer a differentiated approach to corporate governance.
Miriam AttiasFinlandAuthors & Creative
Hate crimes
Other (add details below
Miriam Attias (Finland/Suomi) is an independent mediator, researcher, trainer and consultant in community and neighbourhood conflicts and workplace disputes. Her areas of interest and expertise are identity- and intergroup conflicts and depolarisation strategies.In this conversation, Miriam and Joakim reflect on the use of restorative justice in cases of polarisation, integroup conflict and hate crime. They refer to the basics of restorative justice, naming those values and practice principles which are at the core of the movement, and they present challenges and opportunities to be considered by restorative justice professionals when offering a restorative justice process to those parties involved in a conflict, or even violent crime, as a consequence of polarisation and hate. Why do we consider and work with restorative justice in these cases? What is our vision? How are values and needs perceived and understood by diverse and unique individuals? What is the role of the mediator and how can he/she ensure that his/her own background is not a limit to the encounter? What to recommend to those practitioners offering restorative justice in cases of polarization and hate crime?
Fania DavisUSAOther (add details belowCivil rights trial lawyer for 27 years. Restorative Justice writer, practitioner 17 years. Specializing in intersections of racial justice, indigeneity and restorative justice,This keynote presentation will address the questions what is new and what does justice require in this George Floyd moment? It will discuss the historical role of U.S. police as enforcers of white supremacy and racial terror. It will explore defunding the police as a fundamentally abolitionist call to the collective imagination to imagine new futures and new ways of ensuring public safety where, finally, black lives will matter. This keynote also discusses calls to move beyond the narrow justice of criminal prosecution – blaming, judging, and punishing individual officers – to engage in a nationwide truth-telling process to recognize, take responsibility for and take collective action to repair history’s pain while engendering transformed social relations and structures. Such processes need to come from the grass roots, reflect shared leadership models, be based on restorative justice values of respect, responsibility, relationality and radical healing.
Dr. Muhammad AsadullahCanadaAcademic
Other (add details below
Dr. Muhammad Asadullah is an Assistant Professor at the University of Regina's Department of Justice Studies. Prior to joining UofR, he taught at Simon Fraser University, the University of the Fraser Valley, and Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He completed his PhD as well as a Masters in Criminology from Simon Fraser University, Canada. He also holds a Masters in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University, USA. He is the recipient of multiple awards and scholarships, including Neekaneewak Indigenous Leadership Awards.The concept of decolonization has been used in numerous disciplines and settings, including education, psychology, governance, justice, transitional justice, restorative justice as well as research methods. For Monchalin (2016), decolonization is both a goal and process to bring about a fundamental shift in colonial structures, ideologies and discourses. In the context of Restorative Justice (RJ), decolonization entail a) addressing historical harms of colonization; b) recognizing grievances of indigenous and marginalized communities about the justice system as genuine; and c) acknowledging that state- or INGO-funded RJ practices may do more harm than good. This paper begins with a brief overview of decolonization discourses from micro and macro perspectives to then locate decolonization in justice settings, arguing against “copying and pasting” Eurocentric models of RJ practices. Grounded in the findings of RJ visionaries and practitioners in Bangladesh, this study proposes a decolonizing framework for RJ practices.
Dr Anamaria OpreaUnited KingdomAcademic
Other (add details below
Dr Anamaria Oprea (nee Szabo) is Senior Lecturer in Social Work at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. She has a keen interest in how restorative justice is transferred and transferable at principle and practice levels across various domains, including criminal justice, youth justice, and social care. Dr Oprea is a trained mediator and has research experience in the accessibility and initiation of restorative justice processes. She is leading on a restorative justice module taught at DMU to undergraduate criminology students.Title: Exploring the concept of permeability from a restorative justice perspective. Abstract: This presentation is based on research conducted by Dr. Anamaria Oprea in Vermont, US, that looks at the application of restorative justice principles in child protection work. She explores the theoretical understanding of social systems' permeability and highlights practical aspects that organisations need to take into consideration when deciding to implement restorative justice principles and practices in their daily work. Her thinking is inspired by early prison studies, the history of her home country Romania, and McCold & Wachtel's social discipline window. The audience targeted for this presentation includes, but it is not limited to, professionals working in criminal justice settings, in social care and/or human services, in education and in/with communities. Those wanting to find ways of integrating restorative justice as a new practice or more widely in their organisations can potentially benefit more from the discussion.
Annemieke WolthuisNetherlandsYouth justice
Legal and judicial
Academic
I am an independent researcher, trainer and mediator in Utrecht, the Netherlands. I am affiliated with Restorative Justice Nederland. I also start working as a parttime juvenile judge in Rotterdam. I am a member of the editorial committee of the Dutch/Flemish Journal on RJ and the vice chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice.I will deliver a video conversation with my colleague Maartje Berger who works at Defence for Children. Our theme will be children's rights and restorative justice.
We will talk about the main standards and principles on restorative youth justice, new developments, promising practices and challenges. What is needed to improve the access to RJ for children and young people, what should be done to make the work done more child friendly. What cultures need to be changed to get this all done and implemented?
GRAZIELLA FOUREZBelgiqueExtremismGraziella Fourez studied law and political science. After an experience with Avocats Sans Frontières, she worked as a lawyer for 3 years. In January 2017, she started a PhD in law at Saint-Louis University (Brussels). Her doctoral research aims to examine the opportunity to resort to restorative justice in view of responding to the needs of direct and indirect victims of violent extremism.The potential of RJ in cases of (domestic) violent extremism:

After a brief description of the main characteristics and specificities of terrorism victimization, this presentation will examine the impact of these specificities on the potential development of restorative justice in the field of violent extremism. It will present an adapted model of RJ at micro, meso and macro level in order to address the expectations and needs of direct victims but also of indirect/vicarious victims of terrorism and its broader impact on the dissolution of the social link. This theoretical framework will include a short overview of the main types of restorative programs/experience that can be/were used in view of responding to violent extremism in Europe.
Kristy ElliotAustraliaSchoolsKristy Elliott holds a Bachelor of Teaching, is founder and director of Restorative Pathways and is currently working towards a Masters of Applied Positive Psychology. Kristy is a passionate, experienced and engaging presenter having worked with schools for two decades as a teacher, a consultant and trainer in field of restorative practice and more recently positive education and leadership.Teachers make decisions about how best to respond to their students in the classroom minute by minute. Many disruptive or low-harming student behaviours are often unintentional or reactionary to the environment or learning activity. Low-level disruptive behaviour requires a low-level response, that is, one that promotes self-reflection, offers choice, and has minimal impact on the learning community. This presentation examines student behaviour in context to determine an appropriate response. Three levels of a response continuum will be explored including, positive corrections, affective statements and conversations, and individual restorative chats. An overarching concept of these responses is a strength-based approach to student management. Working with students to uncover their strengths and supporting them to use strengths successfully at school contributes to forming positive relationships. Strength overuse and underuse is examined as a contributor to negative behaviour and relationship outcomes.
Dr Colleen PawlychkaCanadaAdult justice and prisons
Academic
Other (add details below
Dr. Colleen Pawlychka is a faculty member in Criminology at Douglas College, in B.C., Canada. Her areas of expertise include restorative justice and correctional practice, and she is an advocate of trauma-informed correctional care. Her practical experience includes facilitation of experiential conflict resolution workshops and weekly restorative justice circles in a Canadian federal prison. Her teaching bridges the gap between community and prisoners, providing criminology students and those who have experienced prison with opportunities to learn directly from one another.Childhood psychological trauma (CPT) underlies generally accepted criminal risk factors and the role of CPT in generating criminal behaviours is profound. While psychological and behavioural impacts of CPT may continue throughout the lifetime, healing CPT is essential for rehabilitation and is also possible throughout the lifetime. I examined the experiences of former Canadian federal, male prisoners, gaining an in-depth understanding of healing from CPT during prison and community re-entry, from their perspectives. I conducted a series of in-depth interviews with former prisoners who self-identified as having experienced CPT. Impacts of CPT prior to prison and healing experiences during incarceration and community re-entry were explored. This presentation, highlighting the former prisoners’ voices, will emphasize the critical role of community members in the rehabilitative process and the destructive impacts of excessively punitive correctional tactics. Recommendations for correctional practice include increased community-prisoner connection and implementation of trauma-informed correctional care.
Aurélie StollSwitzerlandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
Aurelie Stoll, assistant and researcher in Criminology at the Lausanne University, Switzerland. After her studies at the Universities of Geneva and Lausanne (Bachelor in economic and social sciences and Master in criminology and security), she worked for almost six years as a social worker and probation agent in Switzerland. Her main fields of research are desistance from crime and intervention to encourage conventionnal life among adults and children in conflict with the law in occidental and non occidental contexts.In a criminal justice system context focused on risk-based approaches, this presentation provides a reflection on two strength-based approaches, desistance from crime and restorative justice. While reflecting their specificities, it discusses their common ground in light of their position to the main approaches in the academic world and western criminal justice systems, their objectives and mechanisms. This joint reflection, fueled by real testimonials, outlines new avenues for developing perspectives for reflection and concrete ways to guarantee social balance and peace.
Dr Claudia Campistol MasSwitzerlandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
Claudia Campistol holds a PhD. in Criminology from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. After her studies at the University of Barcelona (M.A. Psychology), she worked for four years in the juvenile justice department of Catalonia, Spain. She has been employed for the past seven years as a researcher and assistant at the University of Lausanne. Claudia has been working for the past eight years and is currently working as a collaborator teacher in juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice at theIn a criminal justice system context focused on risk-based approaches, this paper provides a reflection on two strength-based approaches, desistance from crime and restorative justice. While reflecting their specificities, it discusses their common ground in light of their position to the main approaches in the academic world and western criminal justice systems, their objectives and mechanisms. This joint reflection, fueled by real testimonials, outlines new avenues for developing perspectives for reflection and concrete ways to guarantee social balance and peace.
Frauke PetzoldGermanyOther (add details belowI am a RJ practitioner since 1992, employed at WAAGE Hannover e.V., Germany. Areas of experience are mainly Victim-Offender-Mediation for adults with a main focus on Domestic Violence. I am also a mediator in family and workplace conflicts. Since about 20 years, I am a trainer for RJ and mediation and a supervisor in the field of RJ and Mediation. From 2002 to 2008 I was a member of the Board of the EFRJ.RJ in cases of domestic violence - specifics, possibilities and risks Domestic violence is usually violence by men against women within the family or partnership, often based on an imbalance of power. A fundamental difference to other cases in victim-offender mediation lies in the consideration of the interests of the victims that are worth protecting. Therefore case processing is carried out by a gender-mixed mediation team. Often children are involved and suffer particularly from the violent family situation. The processing of VOM cases in this field requires special sensitivity and competence. Questions/topics within the presentation:
- Characteristics of the particular case constellation and dynamics of the violent relationship
- Work in the gender-mixed mediation team, Co-mediation
- Individual approaches, gender-specific advice
- Individual discussions, mediation discussion, balance sheet discussion
- Cooperation partners, networking
- Perspectives of victims, dealing with traumatisation
- Influence of domestic violence for children
- Exclusion criteria
Dr Brunilda PaliBelgiumEnvironmental justiceDr. Brunilda Pali is a senior researcher at the Leuven Institute of Criminology, KU Leuven, Belgium. She is currently also Secretary of the European Forum for Restorative Justice (EFRJ). Her areas of interest are gender, critical social theory, restorative justice, cultural and critical criminology, environmental justice, and arts. Her research website is www.restorotopias.comEnvironmental restorative justice: A justice framework for preventing, stopping and repairing environmental harms Brunilda Pali Abstract The challenges of developing meaningful responses to environmental harm that stop damaging the earth and its inhabitants (human and other-than human), that repair and heal the devastating harms already made, and build different systems that respect ecosystems and the rights of future generations, have never been greater. Restorative justice presents a great opportunity to bridge the ineffectiveness of existing environmental responses and the pressing need to stop existing harmful practices, repair harms made and prevent future environmental damage. In this presentation, I focus on the theoretical and conceptual alignments that are necessary to make in setting the agenda of environmental restorative justice. In addition, I illustrate with some past, present, or emerging worldwide initiatives on the field the possibilities and limits of the restorative engagement with environmental justice issues.
Geovana FernandesBrazilLegal and judicialMaster’s on Law (focus on RJ). Circles Facilitator. Mediator. Public Servant (Federal Justice) director of ADR’s CenterIn the discussions on the field of alternative dispute resolution, restorative justice emerges as a new legal concept to mobilize a diversity of issues and knowledge. The present study aims to critically analyze the restorative approach in the context of the multidoor courtthouse and from the inflows of the holistic paradigm, as an adequate method to solve conflicts that have generative potential due to traumas and sufferings, in order to allow the interruption of the destructive spiral and thus prevent the emergence of new conflicts. Some foundations and goals of restorative justice are addressed, and even the role of narratives in the re-signification of traumatic experiences and how they can be used in restorative circles. Finally, the potential of restorative justice for the development of mutual recognition is evaluated.
Paramjeet KaurIndiaSexual offences
Other (add details below
Ms. Paramjeet kaur has done M.Phil. in Sociology and is currently working on a research project on ‘Sex Offenders’ as research assistant under the aegis of Dr. Upneet Lalli at the Institute of Correctional Administration, Chandigarh. She has also worked on the research project ‘Quality of Life of Women Prisoners’. Her other areas of expertise are culture, gender issues, human rights etc.
Seema Deswal will also be the co-presenter with her and will submit the video with Dr. Upneet Lalli.
Role of Restorative Justice in Cases of Sexual Violence
Sexual offences against women have been on the rise in India. The legal changes particularly from 2013 have focused on increasing deterrence towards such offences. Relief to the victim has been provided through monetary compensation however, the ground reality is that victim suffer during course of trial and afterwards. Imprisonment of offenders is limited solution to curb offences. In an empirical study on ‘sex offenders’ inside the prisons one of the aims was to find whether if the offender has realization of the harm done to the victim and if they are willing to apologize to the victims. A few of them particularly Young offenders did show some willingness to address the harm that they caused. Thus, the article will examine RJ practice applicability in case of sexual violence in India in order to reduce the harm and bring more accountability.
Seema DeswalIndiaSexual offences
Other (add details below
Ms. Seema Deswal, M.Phil. in Sociology is currently doing her PhD from Panjab University, Chandigarh in Sociology and working on a research project on ‘Profiling of Sex Offenders’ as research assistant under the aegis of Dr. Upneet Lalli at the Institute of Correctional Administration, Chandigarh. Her other areas of expertise includes, gender issues, correctional administration, women police etc. Ms. Paramjeet Kaur will also be the co-Presenter with her and will submit the video with Dr. Upneet Lalli.Role of Restorative Justice in Cases of Sexual Violence
Sexual offences against women have been on the rise in India. The legal changes particularly from 2013 have focused on increasing deterrence towards such offences. Relief to the victim has been provided through monetary compensation however, the ground reality is that victim suffer during course of trial and afterwards. Imprisonment of offenders is limited solution to curb offences. In an empirical study on ‘sex offenders’ inside the prisons one of the aims was to find whether if the offender has realization of the harm done to the victim and if they are willing to apologize to the victims. A few of them particularly Young offenders did show some willingness to address the harm that they caused. Thus, the article will examine RJ practice applicability in case of sexual violence in India in order to reduce the harm and bring more accountability.
Jen Cato & Dr Lesley CampbellNew ZealandAdult justice and prisonsRestorative Justice Ōtautahi’s Manager Jen Cato and Facilitators and researcher Dr Lesley Campbell, Director for Lebern and Associates consultancy. Lesley has a track record, over some 20 years, of thought, people and results leadership within New Zealand’s public service and across justice, social development and tertiary education sectors. Educated at Otago and Canterbury Universities, Lesley has a Doctor of Philosophy in public sector management; post-graduate Diploma in Social Work; and Bachelor of Arts (Honours), First Class in Social Anthropology.This presentation describes the findings from the process and outcome evaluation of pre-sentencing restorative justice conferences facilitated by Restorative Justice Ōtautahi, an NGO whose main purpose is to promote reconciliation and healing for people who have experienced harm, people who harm and their whānau, hapu, iwi/community. Several approaches were used to investigate the outcomes and ‘what works’ elements of the service – including programme theory logic model, qualitative impact assessment protocol and success case method. The results of this evaluation include justice and psychosocial outcomes for participants of Restorative Justice Ōtautahi conferences, elements of the service that appear to contribute most effectively to outcomes sought and dimensions of quality (effectiveness, efficiency, accessibility, client-centredness, equity, safety) associated with the work of the agency. The programme theory framework produced by this evaluation has significance for the transformation of New Zealand’s criminal justice system as outlined in He Waka Roimata, 2019.
Mike HintonNew ZealandAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Legal and judicial
Mike served with the New Zealand Army for twenty years, involved in training and development, he had many instructor and leadership positions. He established the Restorative Justice programme at the Manukau Urban Māori Authority (MUMA), in Auckland, New Zealand, which has been running since 1997. He held positions on the RJA executive and was also the Chairperson for Restorative Practices Aotearoa (RPA). Mike worked with MUMA for 15 years before taking on his present role as General Manager of RPA.Have we just become a tool in the justice system? My presentation will explore the challenges and changes of Restorative Justice shifting from a community approach to a mainstream approach. As part of the mainstream justice system, practitioners and provider groups have challenges around compliance within the justice system. At times, this can be at odds with the essence of Restorative Justice.
Christine & Mark RutledgeNew ZealandAdult justice and prisons
Other (add details below
Christine is a self employed counselor with over 25 years experience, working with Children, Young People and Adults. She has also works along side the local Restorative Justice provider bringing the Children's perspective into the Restorative Justice conference process. Mark has been facilitating Restorative Justice conferences for 16 years employed by Nelson Restorative Justice Trust. He has both Standard and Family Harm accreditation.We hope to be able to give the listener a teaser to help draw them into an understanding and passion for the needs of Children who have been affected by the situations we work with through the Restorative Justice process. Children are the unseen and unheard victims of harm. Often never mentioned or only referred to generically. They were there they experienced it. We want to be able to help facilitators understand the needs and ways for the voice of children to be heard through the conference process. All children that have experienced a harmful situation have been affected in some way and can benefit enormously from being involved in the Restorative Justice conferencing process.
Assoc. Prof. Marie KeenanIrelandAdult justice and prisons
Sexual offences
Victim support
Marie Keenan is an Associate Professor at the School of Social Policy, Social Work and Social Justice, University College Dublin (2000-present) and a member of the Advisory Board of UCD’s Criminology Institute. She is an accredited psychotherapist, a restorative justice practitioner and a registered social worker. Her publications include Child Sexual Abuse in the Catholic Church: Gender, Power and Organizational Culture, (2012), OUP; and Restorative Responses to Sexual Violence: Legal Social and Therapeutic Dimensions, (2017), Routledge (with Estelle Zinsstag (Eds).This presentation is based on four decades of practice and research in the field of sexual violence, offered through the lens of a practitioner researcher on a road of therapy, justice and community safety. The presentation focuses on one dimension of that work: restorative justice. Divided into three sections the presentation begins by addressing what it means to be harmed by sexual violence and why someone so harmed would want to meet with the person who offended against them. Part two asks what it means to be responsible for perpetrating sexual violence and why meeting with the person one harmed, if requested to do so, can help re-narrate a future and reduce self-loathing. The third part of the presentation focuses on the social, moral and justice imperative to offer restorative justice as a norm in the aftermath of sexual crime and offers suggestions on the essentials of best practice.
Ailbhe GriffithIrelandSexual offences
Victim support
I am an advocate for victim-initiated restorative justice following my own experience of a restorative meeting with the person who offended against me in 2014. My experience in restorative justice is not professional but of a personal nature. I am passionate about it and have travelled internationally and domestically (within Ireland) advocating for its use in cases of serious violence including sexual crime. I participated in a film depicting my real-life experience entitled 'The Meeting' in which I play myself.My presentation will take place in the form of a documentary-style interview/presentation which would last a maximum of thirty minutes. I will split my story several segments which will detail (i) my experience of crime and of the criminal justice system and what remained unresolved for me (ii) my experience of a restorative justice meeting with the person who harmed me and (iii) the long-term impact of the restorative meeting and my observations as to how it can help victims of crime, including those who have experienced serious sexual violence. Each segment will have a title to it which will highlight the area I plan to cover. My presentation will take place in a similar format to that of Dr. Marie Keenan's which may be linked in some manner with my own.
Anna GregoryUnited KingdomSchools
Academic
Authors & Creative
Anna is a Director at The Restorative Lab – a company at the forefront of conflict transformation research and restorative practice. Anna is a dynamic facilitator with on the ground experience of leading culture change programmes. Anna provides support, training and development to communities to promote the foundational skills needed for conflict transformation. Anna uses Theatre of the Oppressed techniques to explore how research can be more participatory, visual and creative.Anna will share the results of her PhD research. Specifically, a participatory action research project underpinned by a restorative approach. Working with 12 child co-researchers Anna explored how we might better experience, know and transform conflict. Through a collaborative inquiry that sought transformative solutions to complex relational and systemic problems, the group co-created a more inclusive, just and peaceful research experience. In her work, Anna challenges the pathologizing of children and develops as egalitarian (as is possible) researcher relationships. This project used the philosophy of a restorative approach, the methodology of participatory action research and the methods of the Theatre of the Oppressed to produce unique and surprising findings.
Clair AldingtonScotlandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Authors & Creative
Clair is a creative and a restorative practitioner based in Scotland. She trained as a restorative practitioner in 2002 and combines her artmaking practice with her RJ work. From 2001-2007, she worked with Oxfordshire Youth Offending Service, England, and currently works with Space2face RJ Arts Organisation, Shetland, Scotland. Clair is in the final year of her PhD, which investigates whether a handmade gifted object can enable connections, or moments of convergence and solidarity across the space between people in RJ.I am interested in spaces, and the voices that connect across them. In this presentation, I will introduce elements of my PhD research in Restorative Justice and Design, on which I have worked as a creative and a restorative researcher-practitioner. My studies investigate this inter-disciplinary way of working with RJ participants and ask what it can contribute to moments of solidarity and convergence between people harmed and responsible. I will examine some of the words and phrases I have gathered to begin a discussion around language for speaking about the narratives of convergence (from ‘com’ - with, together + ‘vergere’ - to bend, turn, tend toward). As part of the presentation, I will show handmade objects gifted between participants in RJ encounters, and you will hear through the artwork, the voices of the creators, and the moments of convergence they enabled, in part, through their objects.
Terence BevingtonUnited KingdomSchools
Academic
Other (add details below
I am a restorative researcher and consultant based in the UK and working internationally, specialising in education and workplace settings.My recently completed doctoral research explores what ‘everyday peace’ means to students and staff in English secondary schools. The findings from the study shine light on the ways in which a restorative approach in schools can help to promote personal, relational and institutional peace. I will share these hot-off-the-press findings by means of an Everyday Peace in Schools framework. Using this framework, schools will be able to map out how their restorative practice does and could contribute to building a culture of positive peace.
Anna GregoryUnited KingdomSchoolsTerence is Director of Conexus Conflict Consultancy, UK and is a critical and committed restorative trainer, consultant and researcher working with schools to develop their conflict competence and peace-building capacities. Anna is a Programme Director for Peacemakers – an educational charity in the UK. Anna provides support, training and development to school communities to promote the foundational skills needed for positive peace. Anna and Terence are both PhD candidates contributing to the fields of peace education in schools.Restorative Practice as Peace Practice: How might peace be a useful lens from which to view restorative practice? Anna and Terence present their chapter in 'Getting More Out Of Restorative Practices in Schools'. Their framework contributes to the work of Kathy Evans and Dorothy Vaandering’s who present a progression of restorative practice as something to help with behaviour management through to its potential to build culture. Anna and Terence expand the continuum to explore a transformational element when restorative is framed as peace. This conceptualisation of restorative work in schools is informed by their research and grounded in their practical engagement with peace education and restorative approaches in schools. Building on the work they’ve done in the UK and internationally to help them frame restorative-work as peace-work, Anna and Terence offer educators an expanded view of what’s possible when it comes to restorative approaches in schools.
Dr Upneet LalliIndiaAdult justice and prisons
Sexual offences
Legal and judicial
A Doctorate in Psychology and a qualified lawyer,and human rights advocate. Presently Deputy Director at Institute of Correctional Administration,Chandigarh,India. Associated with training,policy making related to prisons and custodial justice, and gender justice issues. A member of the Global Advisory Council of Restorative Justice International .Personal and professional interest in reforming the criminal justice system in India, through the development of human rights and socially just practices combined with restorative justice.Rethinking Justice the Restorative way in India The limitations and shortcomings of conventional criminal justice has led to a re-look and reassessment of the relationships between offenders, victims and the State in criminal cases in various jurisdictions across the world. This has sparked a growing interest in restorative justice. The author argues that a focus on mere retribution by the state against the offender further escalates the cycle of violence. There is a need to reshape the Indian criminal justice system into a more open, fair and victim-oriented system. Currently, Restorative justice is almost non- existent in the system. The presentation will discuss the various possibilities of initiating Restorative Justice at various stages of criminal justice system within the present legal framework .Suggestions for legal changes will also be given. The scope of restorative practices within the prison setting will also be explored.
Dr Raquel TiveronBrazilAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Legal and judicial
My name is Raquel Tiveron and I´ve been working as a prosecutor in Brazil for 15 years. Along all those years, I applied Restorative Justice Practices in many criminal cases, which I´d like to share worldwide. I have a PhD degree in law and I work also as a graduation teacher at Uniceub, the biggest law university in Brasília (the capital of Brazil), where I teach Restorative Practice and Criminal Law to our students.Restorative Justice and Criminal (in) Justice: what Brazil has to learn and to contribute to the world? In my presentation, I intend to address the main differences between Brazil and other countries in applying restorative justice practices, such as: crimes in which RJ is applied, the legal mechanisms thought the RJ is designed and the population that is benefited with the practice. I also intend to approach RJ´s challenges, as example, the results that are expected and that are really reached, the difficulties RJ faces to be effectively implemented and the potential to spread RJ around the country. I hope that by facing its specificities, Brazil will have lots to learn and lots to show to the world with its own way to practice RJ.
Tim ChapmanNorthern IrelandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
Tim Chapman lectured for 10 years at Ulster University on the Masters in Restorative Practices. He has trained hundreds of people from criminal justice, schools, social work and civil society agencies to become restorative practitioners. He has published widely on restorative justice and has conducted significant research on restorative justice and intercultural conflict. He has delivered training in restorative justice throughout the world, most recently for the UNODC. He is chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice.Keynote
A Vision for Restorative Justice: From Ego to Ecosystem.

This presentation will outline a brief history of the development of restorative justice and how that history has influenced its theories and practices. This will lead to the view that the modern restorative movement is emerging from its adolescence into its maturity. This will entail a transition from an 'ego-centric' state towards full engagement with ecosystems. Tim Chapman will argue that this transition will demand a fundamental reorientation and changes in concepts that have been seen as crucial to restorative thinking and practice. Some of these suggested changes will be challenging to those active in the field and should stimulate an interesting dialogue.
Dr Belinda HopkinsUnited KingdomYouth justice
Schools
Other (add details below
I founded Transforming Conflict, National Centre for Restorative Approaches in Youth and Community Settings 25 years ago. I am a restorative practitioner, a trainer and consultant, and a published author. I pioneered the concept of a whole-school restorative approach across the UK in the early 2000’s. Transforming Conflict now also works with staff in children’s residential care, youth organisations and community care. I have been on the EFRJ Values and Principles Working Party and is currently on their Training Committee.R.E.S.T.O.R.E. our schools Worldwide, school communities are facing a ‘new normal’ – after months of isolation and frightening news bulletins – returning to strange new environments facing guidelines that keep people at a distance, hidden behind masks, unable to socialise. There is huge pressure to make up for lost time academically. Schools may be tempted to become even more authoritarian to bring students back in line after months away from the routines and rhythms of their school community. Belinda Hopkins and Monica Alberti will present a package of resources designed by UK restorative practitioners to support the mental and emotional health of the whole school community at this time of crisis. (www.restoreourschools.com) Belinda was part of the original collective. Monica has been using the materials in Catalonia, working with the Catalan Department of Education to implement a restorative approach in schools not just as crisis intervention but for every day.
Pia SlögsFinlandAdult justice and prisons
Other (add details below
Lawyer Pia Slögs is the director of community mediation centre in Finland. She is a restorative trainer and mediator. She has completed her studies on restrorative justice at Univ Hull, UK. She has worked earlier at victim-offender mediation services for 15 years. Pia is a co-trainer in VERSO-programme especially in Swedish spoken schools in Finland.Pia Slögs is a co-presenter with Maija Gellin. See the abstract in Maija Gellin's application: How to create a restorative school culture.
Dr Maija GellinFinlandYouth justice
Schools
Authors & Creative
Dr Maija Gellin is the director of the programme for restorative approach in education and schools (VERSO-programme) in Finland. She has also worked as a mediation officer under the victim-offender mediation service. She is giving lectures on restorative approach at Univ Helsinki and Univ Lapland as well as in many institutions in Finland and other countries. She is a board member of Finnish Forum for Mediation and a member of Finnish women peace builder’s group and Nordic mediation researcher’s group.How to create a restorative school culture Restorative values such as respect, sense of community and participation as well as the rights of the child are more important than ever from the perspective of global health and well-being threats. Implementing the restorative approach in schools and day care is focusing not only giving restorative methods to school staff members but more to change the whole school culture to a restorative one. Based on 20 year experience in Finnish schools and the results of PhD research, this session is opening the key concepts of a restorative school community. Including restorative attitude, restorative participation and restorative mediation as basics for daily work in schools and kindergartens strengthens the positive identity of children as well as the wellbeing of whole school community and families. When the skill of restorative encounter is learned already in a school, this ability provides know-how throughout the life.
Dr Rodrigo Rodrigues DiasBrazilYouth justice
Victim support
Legal and judicial
PhD in Law from the University of Vale do Rio dos Sinos (Unisinos), Master in Social Sciences from the State University of Western Paraná (Unioeste), graduated in Law from the University of São Paulo (USP). Titular judge of the Court of Childhood and Youth and Annexes of the District of Toledo / PR and coordinator of the Judicial Center for Conflict and Citizenship (Cejusc)where are developed ADR's method, specially RJ and mediation.My proposition is to present my experience as a judge, a mediator, a facilitator of peacemaking circles and as an instructor of mediatiors and facilitators
Paulo MoratelliBrazilAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Schools
Psychologist, International Delegate for Brazil of the Sociedad Científica de Justicia Restaurativa (Spain), Member of the Global Advisory Council of Restorative Justice International (USA), and Executive Director of Coonozco. Independent lecturer and instructor of Restorative Justice, Transformative Justice, Transformative Circles (a method he developed), and Peacemaking Circles, a method in which he was certified as an instructor by Kay Pranis in 2012.Transformative Dialogues for serious harms and crimes - including homicides, gender violence and sexual abuse.
Marta Sá Rebelo & Laura HeinPortugal / BelgiumAdult justice and prisons
Academic
Other (add details below
Marta Sá Rebelo: Ph.D. researcher at Católica Global School of Law in Portugal (research fields: human rights and restorative justice). She is a teaching assistant at the Portuguese Catholic University and a prison volunteer worker. Laura Hein is an Italian PhD student and teaching assistant at KU Leuven, Belgium (research areas: transitional justice and forced displacement). She works as a policy officer for the European Forum for Restorative Justice and has extended professional experience in the field of human rights.Last May, George Floyd, a black man, was killed in Minneapolis by a white police officer during an arrest. His death generated a series of demonstrations and protests in the US and throughout the world, which sometimes turned violent. Seeing this as a murder and as a series of crimes against property is to look merely at the tip of the iceberg. A restorative response would seek to address the roots of the conflict. However, in cases of structural violence such as this a narrow view of restorative justice will not suffice. Only a wide-range restorative strategy will be capable of addressing the deeper causes of institutional violence. In this video, we will explore the possibility of borrowing some insights from transitional justice, which is associated with periods of political change and deals with gross violations of human rights, to seek a broader restorative response to the case.
Lamika WilsonUSAYouth justice
Victim support
Academic
Hi my name is Lamika! I've been in education for over 10 years. I have a Masters in educational leadership. I have a bachelors in English Literature and Special Education. I am passionate about serving parents and students with disabilities. I am dedicated in assisting and serving victims of crimes. As I have been victimized. My goal is to advocate for our most vulnerable population and high priority citizens.my proposed presentation would be on localizing an office for victims that is assessable to the community citizens and help assisting Albany New York with providing direct services such as counseling, financial assistance timely and other supplemental resources needed to overcome trauma.
Joakim Hope Soltveit & Miriam AttiasNorwayYouth justice
Extremism
Hate crimes
Joakim Hope Soltveit (Norway) is a senior adviser in the Norwegian National Mediation Service, Konfliktraadet. He is a lay mediator, trainer for mediators and expert in restorative justice in cases of youths and restorative justice in cases of violent extremism and hate crime.
Miriam Attias (Finland) is an independent mediator, researcher, trainer and consultant in community and neighbourhood conflicts and workplace disputes. Her areas of interest and expertise are identity- and intergroup conflicts and depolarisation strategies.
In this conversation, Miriam and Joakim reflect on the use of restorative justice in cases of polarisation, intergroup conflict and hate crime. They refer to the basics of restorative justice, naming those values and practice principles which are at the core of the movement, and they present challenges and opportunities to be considered by restorative justice professionals when offering a restorative justice process to those parties involved in a conflict, or even violent crime, as a consequence of polarisation and hate. Why do we consider and work with restorative justice in these cases? What is our vision? How are values and needs perceived and understood by diverse and unique individuals? What is the role of the mediator and how can he/she ensure that his/her own background is not a limit to the encounter? What to recommend to those practitioners offering restorative justice in cases of polarization and hate crime?
Dr Aarne KinnunenFinlandAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Legal and judicial
Dr. Aarne Kinnunen is holding a post of a Senior Ministerial Advisor in the Department of Criminal Policy and Criminal Justice in the Ministry of Justice in Finland. He has a long experience in developing crime prevention, anti-corruption and restorative justice measures in Finland. He is holding a PhD in Social Sciences and has been nominated as an Adjunct Professor to the University of Eastern Finland.The years 2018-2020 saw a number of new international legal instruments and guidelines relating to restorative justice. This presentation focuses on one such document, the Council of Europe Recommendation CM/Rec(2018)8 concerning restorative justice in criminal matters. The speakers will outline the significance and key features of the Recommendation, and explain the implications for policy. They will also discuss its implementation, how it can be used to influence policy and practice at the domestic level, and how it fits with other recent international guidelines (such as by the United Nations) and proposed developments in the international framework (such as by the European Union).
Adam VoigtAustraliaSchoolsI'm a former School Principal who has spent the last 8 years as the CEO of Real Schools. I partner with schools to build strong, relational and sustainable cultures through Restorative Practices. I speak widely in the media and am the Education Expert for Channel 10's 'The Project' and I'm a regular columnist for major newspapers in Australia. In just a few weeks, my book 'Restoring Teaching' will be released.Title - The Restorative School Culture

Description - Almost everyone agrees that the culture of a school is important. And yet, almost nobody can define what culture really is, beyond a feeling or a vibe. It raises a critical question ... 'How do we work on the culture of a school if we're not sure what it is?'

This presentation provides a roadmap for School Leaders and Teachers who see the potentials and benefits in theirs being a truly restorative one. Presented by somebody who has led this work in his own schools and in through countless consultative school partnerships, it highlights what works in restorative cultures, what the pitfalls are and what the boundless possibilities are.

This presentation is peppered with inspiring stories and case studies from schools who have already completed restorative transformations and are reaping the rewards of working in a connected and supportive community culture.
Eric RaineyUnited StatesSchoolsAfter 21 years in education, training and coaching was a natural progression for Eric, combining the powerful concepts of restorative practices and his natural leadership ability has proven to be a dynamic and results driven endeavor. His training and coaching has been described as "powerful", "insightful", "passionate" "educational", and "inspiring". Eric's sincere desire to serve others and positively impact those he encounters is refreshing and evident to those who experience him.This dynamic session will detail the mindful and transformative process of moving from the traditional punitive In-School Suspension model to the powerful Restoration Station model. Dr. Angela C. Monell and International Institute of Restorative Practices trained Eric Rainey will lead you through the step by step process of re-imagining a space for consequences to a space for support and skill-building. Attendees will leave this session with a clear understanding of the educational, social, emotional, and psychological benefits of transitioning to this new model. Attendees will gain valuable insight from a school administrator perspective, understand the importance of human capital, social emotional learning and the many facets of restorative practices that are necessary within the daily wrap-around model to build the capacity of students beyond the classroom.
Mark GoodwinUnited KingdomSchools
Academic
I am a UK freelance teacher, trainer & coach with 20 years experience working across phases in a number of schools. I currently work in Alternative Provision with kids who are permanently excluded from school or at risk of exclusion, delivering a solutions focused coaching programme alongside key curriculum. I also work to prevent kids being excluded by training staff in restorative and relational teaching approaches. My work has been published in the TES & the Chartered College Impact magazine.Reconnecting with young people after Covid After recent events there will be hundreds of kids who feel disconnected from school, learning and even themselves. This will most keenly be felt by those who are already disadvantaged and marginalised. Drawing on my experience and expertise in reconnecting excluded kids to learning, I will present what is needed in the coming weeks and months to support a successful reconnection....the mindset teachers need; the learning kids can do; the relationships that will be needed to be built. I will explain my approaches - Meet the kids where they are; Throw a wide circle; I see you; See the Best Part and Check Yourself. The talk is full of practical advice and approaches that anybody working with young people can take away and use.
Prof. Ivo AertsenBelgiumAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Academic
Ivo Aertsen is Emeritus Professor of Criminology at the University of Leuven (Belgium). He holds degrees of psychology, law and criminology from the same university. At the Leuven Institute of Criminology (LINC) he has been leading the Research Line on ‘Restorative Justice and Victimology’. He was the first chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice, from 2000-2004, and coordinated various European research projects in the field of restorative justice. He is Editor-in-Chief of 'The International Journal of Restorative Justice’.The history of the RJ movement and the potential of RJ in serious crime In this presentation, I will look back at the recent history of restorative justice and will discuss the role of doing restorative justice in serious crime in the development of the movement. In particular, I will focus on the relationship with criminal justice and furthermore will reflect on the causes, consequences and challenges of restorative justice developing away from criminal law.
Gema VaronaSpainAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Environmental justice
Lecturer in Victimology and Criminal Policy at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) and senior researcher at the Basque Institute of Criminology (Donostia/San Sebastian, Spain). Current coordinator of the UPV/EHU MOOC on Victimology, and co-director of the Master in Victimology of that University, she is also the co-editor of the Journal of Victimology/Revista de Victimología. She has authored books and articles on migration and human rights, restorative justice, violence against women, victims of terrorism, and victims of sexual abuse.This presentation will share personal reflections and experience on restorative justice and violent extremism, with a focus on victims of terrorism and community (art) relational projects in the Basque Country. In concrete, the project "walking restoratively" will be presented.
Osariemen OmoruyiNigeriaAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Legal and judicial
Osariemen Omoruyi is a restorative justice advocate in Nigeria with special interest in peace building, prison reform, social innovation, human rights, juvenile justice reform and the rule of law. She is currently leading the movement known as Restorative Justice for Africa (REJA), a non-governmental organization that gives Restorative Justice a voice in Nigeria.My team mate and I intend to talk about how Restorative Justice programmes can be enshrined in the Nigerian Criminal Justice system. At Restorative Justice for Africa Initiative, we are rigorously raising awareness about the numerous benefits of Restorative Justice and as such, we are advocating for the implementation of Restorative Justice in Nigeria. We are certain that this would go a long way to decongest the Correctional centres in Nigeria and curb criminal re-offending.
Anooj BhandariUnited StatesYouth justice
Schools
Authors & Creative
Anooj Bhandari is a transformative justice practitioner focusing on the relationship between the intimacy of creative expression in communities and the abolition of retributive tactics across and between boundaries and borders. His work is largely based in the United States but has worked on Restorative Justice related projects around the globe, including youth justice programs in India and Thailand. He has worked as the Restorative Justice Coordinator with Make the Road NY, and is a performer with the NY Neo-Futurists.I am interested in exploring youth justice, particularly what it means to create spaces of education through a Restorative Justice lens that are alternative to traditional classroom and pedagogically didactic spaces. This session will explore personal shifts from Retributive to Restorative to Transformative Justice through a creative arts lens, and will imagine community education spaces as microcosm for larger society as we explore how our intimate relationships can shape how we view the structure of spaces in which we seek to carry out Restorative Justice. This session will be oriented towards community educators of all kind who are interested in Restorative Justice as praxis, and working on RJ from a framework of transformative systems change for cultivating a more liberatory future for youth.
Claudia Christen-SchneiderSwitzerlandAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Academic
Claudia Christen-Schneider holds an MSc in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Portsmouth, England, and studied Restorative Justice at SFU in Canada. She’s also a certified mediator and the founder and president of the Swiss RJ Forum. She’s very active in promoting, developing and implementing restorative justice in Switzerland and also involved in the EFRJ’s values & standards committee.Restorative justice declares the “healing of harms caused by crime" a primary aim for victims and offenders (Zehr, 2002). Thus, it seems that trauma-healing should form part of RJ’s practices. Additionally, RJ shares several commonalities with the concept of ‘trauma-informed care’, which aims to create an environment where professionals know about trauma and adapt their practice according to this knowledge. Both trauma-informed care and RJ seek to promote healing in trauma-survivors through empowerment, story-telling, building healthy and secure relationships and stimulating reconnection. However, according to available literature and conducted research, many RJ programs seemingly lack a trauma-informed approach. Hence, the question arises if RJ currently fails to live up to its own goals of providing a needs-based and healing form of justice. The presentation will address this question and explain what it means to work trauma-informed with all stakeholders in a restorative process.
Dr Ian MarderIrelandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
Dr. Ian D. Marder is Lecturer in Criminology at Maynooth University Department of Law (Ireland). His Ph.D., from the University of Leeds, focused on the institutionalization of restorative justice in the police. In 2017/18, he worked for the Council of Europe to draft a new Recommendation concerning restorative justice in criminal matters. Now, he works with governments and criminal justice agencies to support the development and implementation of restorative justice.The years 2018-2020 saw a number of new international legal instruments and guidelines relating to restorative justice. This presentation focuses on one such document, the Council of Europe Recommendation CM/Rec(2018)8 concerning restorative justice in criminal matters. The speakers will outline the significance and key features of the Recommendation, and explain the implications for policy. They will also discuss its implementation, how it can be used to influence policy and practice at the domestic level, and how it fits with other recent international guidelines (such as by the United Nations) and proposed developments in the international framework (such as by the European Union). This is a joint presentation with Aarne Kinnunen, invited by the European Forum for Restorative Justice.
Rick Kelly & Symone WaltersCanadaAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Other (add details below
Symone and Rick met thru George Brown College in Canada; she as a student and he as a professor in the Child and Youth Practitioner program, Their bonds were forged thru their passion for restorative practices. This was enhanced thru her project work in the Social Innovation Hub. This continued on beyond graduation. Both have developed their own social enterprises. Her’s is named “Towards a Higher Journey” – T.A.H.J.” and his is named “Just Us: A Centre for Restorative Practices”.This session focuses on our efforts which are directed towards addressing anti-black racism and other forms of oppression thru a restorative and peace-making lens. Building on the lived experiences of Black Youth, their marginalization and exclusion from economic opportunities and privilege, and Symone’s tragic loss of her 15-year-old son, which led to innovations around building a community centre (TAHJ) and a 3-year mentoring program for Black Youth into the trades. This work is fueled by personal passion turned purpose, the tools provided in a Social Innovation Hub and 20 years of fashioning a restorative approach as a craft. The focus will be on the narratives behind these efforts, the pedagogy which informs the efforts and the principles of social innovation and design thinking relevant to second order change. The initiatives take a relational approach to what have been called “wicked problems” which are sustained by siloed, colonized ways of thinking.
Arti MohanIndiaYouth justiceI work in New Delhi, India with a non-profit, Counsel to Secure Justice as Restorative Justice Program Officer. We are working on implementing a pilot restorative justice project for children in conflict with law.Needs-rights based child-friendly restorative justice

Restorative justice is being increasingly offered to children in conflict with the law. While there are potential benefits, there are also risks that come with offering restorative justice to children. To ensure children's best interests and safety, child rights need to be interwoven into restorative justice practices. In addition, children's unique developmental needs also need to be considered. This presentation will explore the intersection of child-rights with restorative justice along with ways to create a needs-rights based restorative justice program for children in conflict with the law.
Tāne HoustonNew ZealandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Schools
Kia Ora my name is Tāne Wiremu Houston and I am from Aotearoa. I am a Restorative Justice facilitator in my region of Taranaki working with adults. I am employed by a trust who I feel are setting the standard for the Restorative process in our country. My interest in this programme is based on an excitement I feel in being apart of what could become a gateway to healthy, resorative conversations at a global, unified level.My presentation will primarily be based on the Value of Offender honesty. I aim to highlight the benefits of finding grounds within the restorative conversations to promote, encourage and assist Offenders with speaking truthfully towards the people who are affected and/or harmed by crime.

My presentation will focus on how to promote healthy interactions with offenders to encourage them towards understanding that one of the major benefits of Restorative Justice is to be found within the uncensored (allbeit) safe execution of TRUTH around the nature and causes of their offence.

In my experience it has been cases in which offenders have courageously engaged in these truths that we have seen wonderful progress towards forgiveness and understanding for all involved. Furthermore, in cases where the offender truth has not been established I have noticed a shortcoming in the success of our programme.
Leaf SeligmanUnited StatesAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Authors & Creative
writer, clergy, college instructor, former jail chaplain, AVP in prisons, Nonviolent Communication and some training in trauma, RJ practitioner/USA/ currently teach at Keene State College (Keene, NH) and work with county on RJ initiatives. Self employed writer/speaker.The Importance of Tenderness: Cultivating Accountability and Community through trauma-informed, self-compassion. I will address the critical need for a practical and compassionate approach to cultivate accountability, factoring in the widespread effects of trauma and the errant approach to justice that seeks to punish rather than understand. I will invite listeners to reflect on the challenge of developing compassion for self and others in the context of polarization, marginalization and collective anxiety. With warmth, humor and pragmatic tools, as an author, minister, educator and restorative justice practitioner, I will offer a pathway to greater connection, compassion and accountability necessary for a community restored to wholeness where everyone can flourish.
Robert PorterUnited StatesAdult justice and prisonsI spent close to 30 years of my life in and out of the revolving doors of the criminal justice system . I am now a mental health professional, a substance use counselor, a board member for the Restorative Justice Project of Maine, and Community Liaison for Volunteers of America in collaboration with the Waldo County (Maine) Sheriff's Office.I would like to present a personal narrative of where I was, what I struggled with, and where I am today including how RJ practices played a major role in where I am today. I would also like to present and discuss with whomever a video of an interview I participated in regarding an event titled "What's Art Got To Do With It?; The Opiate Epidemic." that occurred last fall in Belfast, Maine. The Vimeo Link of the interview is below:
https://vimeo.com/428242585
Virginia DomingoSpainAdult justice and prisonsI am the presidente of Scientific Society of Restorative Justice, working in restorative justice since 2004 in my city Burgos (Spain) I coordinate a restorative justice service in muy city since 2006 we use victim-offender mediation and conferencing and new we have an individual pioner restorative justice program in prisons since 2019, it is working quite good, and would like to speak about it. I am also part of Restorative justice international and I have a hashtag restorative justice revolution.Me gustaría hablar de nuestro programa pionero de justicia restaurativa en la prisión de Burgos, además de la importancia que tiene esta justicia para las personas, asimismo quiero hablar de mi hastaga revolución restaurativa y cómo debemos re evolucionar la justicia a todos los niveles y humanizarla. Aunque sé ingles creo que será mejor que hable en español.
Richard DeningAustraliaAdult justice and prisonsRichard Dening is Manager of the Adult Restorative Justice Conferencing in Queensland. He has degrees in law, peace and conflict studies, legal practice, and a Master of Conflict Management and Resolution.Restorative Justice Conferencing for adults is not commonly offered as a diversion from the criminal justice system in Australia (VOICES). Richard will explore the opportunities and challenges which are presented by providing RJ with adults in a diversionary context, including questions about motivations, the victim/offender 'transaction', and the interface with the criminal justice system (VALUES). This presentation will also consider the question of whether diversionary RJ can contribute to avoiding criminalising members of the society, or is it just another forum to play out discrimination and inequality? (VISION)
Joseph LaurenCanadaLegal and judicial
Other (add details below
I am the Program Director for Restorative Justice Housing Ontario and I went from "riches to restorative justice" as the first Canadian to receive a Federal Prison sentence for insider trading to what I do now for a new registered charity assisting ex-offenders.I will discuss what miraculous event in prison led me from a life making millions a year as a former lawyer/inside trader to now working as the first Program Director of RJHO.ca trying to find safe housing for ex-offenders who are committed to reform, but cannot do so on their own because of finances and discrimination tied to their criminal records.

More information about me, as well as the trailer to my educational-documentary "Collared," can be found on my website:

collaredconsulting.com
David MilgaardCanadaAdult justice and prisonsI am a advocate for the "PRISONER" and also the "WRONGLY CONVICTED" in Canada. I am a wrongly convicted Advisor for the IRB (working group) presently working with the Minister of Justice, David Lametti as a stakeholder in the creation of a new Independent Review Commission mandated by our Prime Minister Justine Trudeau. I speak in Universities across Canada and at Conferences that are related to the Justice Community so to speak.TBA
Charlotte CalkinUnited KingdomAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Sexual offences
I am an Accredited practitioner & trainer with the RJC in the UK, I hold the Howard League Award for Restorative Approaches, I have a Masters from Cambridge University on Restorative Practice in Prisons, I have facilitated over 300 + rj conferences and circles, including after terrorist attacks, I have worked internationally, one of 50 RJ champions for RJC. Worked in all sectors & governmentally. Experienced speaker spoken twice with HRH Princess Anne on restorative justice. Website: www.restorativeengagementforum.comI would like to talk about the huge potential of the broader use of restorative tools as experienced in my work. Work includes working for a year, until Jan 2020, for the British Council in Colombia on a project to rehabilitate young offenders founded on restorative principles. Currently I work in 6 UK prisons, with a premiership football club, in business & health & education sectors embedding restorative principles across all behaviors, policies and process. To deal with hate crime, sexual harassment & give alternative ways of managing environments & shifting cultures. it is very exciting work, training organisations in new approaches that are transforming cultures. I have amazing transformative stories which I am currently writing into a book. I look forward to hearing from you.
Dr Alexa SardinaUnited StatesAdult justice and prisons
Sexual offences
Academic
Alexa Sardina, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Criminal Justice at California State University Sacramento. Alissa Ackerman, PhD is an Assistant Professor at California State University Fullerton in the Division of Politics, Administration and Justice. Our areas of expertise are related sex crimes policy and the use of restorative practices in instances of sexual harm, specifically the use of vicarious restorative justice practices with individuals convicted of sexual offenses.Many individuals who perpetrate sexual harm have not learned or do not understand victim-specific empathy. If people who offend sexually learn about the true consequences of their actions for victims, this decreases their ability to discount the trauma that their actions create ultimately preventing future offending. As “survivor scholars”, we will share our experiences with vicarious restorative justice through the lens of sex crimes researchers and public rape survivors. We have participated as “vicarious victims” with men in sex offender treatment in the community and men incarcerated for other violent offenses. Our experiences with restorative justice have impacted how we teach, how we navigate the dual roles of sex crimes researchers and public rape survivors, the trajectory of our research, and enhanced our belief in the transformative power of empathy and forgiveness.
Dr Lindsey Pointer & Kathleen McGoeyUnited StatesAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
Dr. Lindsey Pointer is an internationally recognized expert in restorative practices education and implementation. She has a PhD in Restorative Justice from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, where she designed and implemented the Restorative University initiative. She is a former Fulbright Fellow and Rotary Global Grant recipient and has completed extensive research on restorative justice best practices. She is passionate about building more connected and caring communities. She currently lives in Colorado.Grounded in an understanding of restorative pedagogy, a paradigm of teaching in alignment with restorative values and principles, this presentation will share games and activities for teaching restorative practices. Games and activities provide a way for learners to experience and more deeply understand restorative practices while building relationships and skills. These games can be used in facilitator or community trainings, with youth in schools, or in the classroom to develop and encourage skills and principles related to restorative practices. In addition to being fun and decreasing resistance to new ideas, game-based learning allows a safe environment to test out new skills, make mistakes, or create a microcosm of a larger social issue. Teaching in a restorative way also redistributes power and truly honors learners’ voices, experiences and perspectives. This presentation will introduce participants to games and activities to take back to their organizations, classrooms, or trainings.
Danny PoaNew ZealandAdult justice and prisons
Youth justice
Academic
I am a native NZ Māori and a descent of Tuhoe and Ngāti Kahungunu. I have an interest in RJ as a practitioner for several providers here in New Zealand over the last 5 years. I have a background in justice and the NGO sector. My current job is I manage an indigenous Science Research Group based in the University of Otago.I am a co-investigator of a research grant awarded to our research team this year investigating restorative practices in NZ and its specific impacts on native Māori participants. We spent time looking into how traditionally, conflict was resolved among Māori and the similarities and differences between these processes and the restorative justice process we use today. We have gathered useful data from a number of experienced Māori restorative justice practitioners and plan to submit multiple articles for publication in the coming months. We have found some interesting implications as it relates to RJ practice within New Zealand but also see the potential of the findings to create interesting discussions in how RJ can progress in other indigenous contexts such as those seen in Australia, Canada, U.S and wider pacific. This platform could be beneficial for us all to have these discussions.
Dr Kelly RichardsAustraliaSexual offencesI am an Associate Professor in the School of Justice at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. My research focuses on restorative justice, youth justice, sexual offending and Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA).This panel will discuss three recent research projects. Dr Bridget Weir considers ‘Child Sexual Abuse and the Catholic Church: Using Techniques of Neutralisation to Examine Institutional Responses to Clergy-Perpetrated Child Sexual Abuse’. (Un)restorative impacts on survivors from Australia’s Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse are discussed. Stephen de Weger discusses a study on reporting experiences of survivors of clergy sexual misconduct against adults in the Catholic Church, drawing on interviews with survivors. The study revealed that reporting processes, instead of being 'pastoral', employed institutional neutralisation. The result: instead of healing and restoration, further harm was experienced. Associate Professor Kelly Richards considers Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA), a quasi-restorative program for reintegrating sexual offenders. She argues that CoSA are successful in reducing sexual reoffending because they “re-establish the circuit of reciprocity”, providing sexual offenders with relationships of mutuality, and creating spaces in which they can give back.
Lorna DyallNew ZealandVictim supportDr Lorna Dyall, Raewyn Bhana, and George Ngatai have been involved in supporting the implementation of restorative justice on the marae and in the community, working with judges, Court staff, Police, facilitators and community leaders working for change. Working from a kaupapa Maori paradigm addressing harm from a victim's perspective has widened the lens to the ongoing victimization of Maori and vulnerable groups in the community. A joint presentation will be providedKaupapa Maori and Restorative Justice : Kanohi ki te Kanohi

A group presentation will be presented on restorative justice for Maori, lessons learned, vision for the future as Maori lives matter, the need for structural, social, justice and political reform required so Maori can live free lives without being victimized to become statistics for Police, Courts Judges, Corrections and providing employment to many in Aotearoa.
COVID-19 and the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota and the Armed Response Unit placed specifically in Maori and Pacific communities with no community engagement resulting in increased criminalization of Maori, requires us to rethink and revisualise what contribution does restorative justice offer to Maori. Further, who needs justice, Aroha, compassion and a fresh start in Aotearoa
Dr Sandra Pavelka & Dale LandryUSAOther (add details belowDr. Sandra Pavelka and Dale Landry previously worked with the Balanced and Restorative Justice Project funded by OJJDP, USDOJ in the late 1990s-2000s. We consulted with juvenile justice system stakeholders to develop and implement restorative justice in communities and states. Since then, we have continued our work, as restorative justice has progressed and evolved.Community Restorative Justice (CRJ) incorporating Balanced and Restorative Justice (BARJ) model, provides efficient, accountable, cost reducing criminal justice reforms that effectively creates safer communities and improves quality of life. The “Village Model” of CRJ provides for residents working mutually with organizations (local government, criminal/juvenile justice, education, faith, etc.) to form CRJ Council that collectively: identify factors that contribute to criminal and factors/activities harmful to community; develop a community justice (CJ) plan to address and overcome factors/activities; develop model RJ practices that reform criminal/juvenile justice systems at each node of system (community policing, community prosecution, community courts, community corrections); and realign and coordinate human and health care services to meet the needs of all individuals harmed within community. This workshop will provide an overview of current criminal justice system, cost associated with certain aspects of the system, define CRJ, BARJ model and a practical view of a “Village Model” CRJ system.
Mark SpainAustraliaOther (add details belowIdentifying and sharing stories of good RP practiceThis presentation describes a continuum of restorative practice from Violence to Regeneration using 7 stages of transition. Each stage is described in terms of the behaviours observed by the people involved. In an organisation aiming to deliver and model restorative practice the capabilities of staff are described at three different levels in the organisation: Front line staff / Supervisor / Executive leader

Using this continuum as the X axis, a matrix is demonstrated with the players in the system, of people and organisations interacting in the world, as the Y axis. These five players are: Client/ Community member / Front line staff / Supervisor / Executive leader
Inter-organisation dynamics
This matrix is a useful tool for practitioners to discuss the system dynamics at work to help make their restorative practice more effective
David VinegradAustraliaSchoolsI work mostly as a trainer and conference facilitator in teacher education in a wide range of Australian and International Schools.Random acts of Restorative Practices - Developing an integrated model of behaviour management in schools.
Margaret ThorsborneAustraliaSchools
Other (add details below
Marg, Sue and Bev are the Ready4RP team. They are based in Australia and have a long and varied history implementing and supporting RP across a variety of settings and countries including Australia, US, UK, SE Asia and NZ. This has led them to develop a framework which can maximise the likelihood of implementation success.Leading Restorative Culture Change: a relational approach to assessing and supporting implementation of Restorative Practices in organisations such as schools, government departments, NGO'S, the Not for Profit sector and community groups.

The session will cover:
* The complex issues of deep culture change
* Assessing readiness using a relational approach
* Key findings from our experiences supporting a variety of organisations in their efforts to implement RP
Tonya CovingtonUnited StatesYouth justice
Schools
United States
I have been doing RJ for 30 years and in particular working and teaching people of color
I will present about a recent experience of training a group of young men of color in Restorative Justice and the unique experiences they bring to the work.
Chris StrakerEnglandYouth justice
Schools
Academic
I co-founded the Hull Centre for Restorative Practice in 2007. I offer consultancy to all agencies working with young people, families and communities across the UK. I have drawn on my experience to develop training in restorative approaches to strategic leadership; I have also worked with cities on strategic, city-wide, implementation. I wrote two chapters for the recent publication by EFRJ on restorative cities. I have been a speaker at national conferences across the UK; and internationally.Exploring the myths behind the restorative city concept. Christopher Straker will use the UK as a backdrop for participants to explore their own ideas on what a restorative city means for them. Context is everything but there are some models Chris will use to create the opportunity for dialogue. Is the restorative city concept a move towards a new paradigm or just Emperor’s new clothes? This workshop explores the concept of right relationships (between professionals and professionals, and the professional and families they work with) and how best to develop these by an explicit dialogue; not only around our areas of agreement, but also our areas of difference. The workshop will look to see how restorative processes can be used to deepen relationships at a city-wide level. by an explicit and shared understanding of behaviours and language. Sometimes our best intentions and goals are undermined by the methods chosen to
Dr Sandra PavelkaUSALegal and judicialDr. Sandra Pavelka serves as Professor and Founding Director of the Institute for Youth and Justice Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University. Dr. Pavelka previously served as Project Administrator of the Balanced and Restorative Justice (BARJ) Project, funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, US DOJ. She provides consultation, training and technical assistance with legislators, justice system and educational stakeholders, and victim advocates in the development and implementation of restorative justice principles, practices, legislation, policies and evaluation.Lawmakers and justice system administrators seek to clarify the aims of justice management and policy, while exploring possibilities for the future of the justice system beyond individual treatment/rehabilitation and retributive justice. Legislators and justice system administrators have reformed their juvenile justice agenda from punitive actions to a means that provides responses to crime and wrongful occurrences by developing and implementing restorative legislation and policies. Restorative justice seeks to balance the needs of the victim, offender and community by repairing the harm caused by wrongdoing and delinquent acts. Dr. Pavelka will present her research that found a majority of states in the US have incorporated restorative justice in statute or code that include general provisions and intent, practices, funding and evaluation. The state of Colorado, which notably implements systemic reform by integrating restorative justice principles and practices in law and policy, is examined as a model state.
Prof. Jessica SilvaBrazilVictim supportAbogada. Profesora universitaria. Facilitador e instructora de justicia restaurativa. Trabaja en el Núcleo de Asistencia a Víctimas de Violencia del Ministerio Público de Ceará in BrasilA través de un plazo de asociación con el programa "Um Novo Tempo", vinculado a la Ejecución penal del Distrito de Fortaleza, se realizó una asociación con el "Proyecto Transformar", que promueve procesos educativos y reflexivos, a través de las metodologías de los círculos culturales. de paz y experiencias sistémicas con víctimas que sufrieron violencia en gran complejidad. El proyecto se lleva a cabo con círculos de apoyo para víctimas.
Dr Hennessey HayesAustraliaYouth justiceHennessey Hayes is a leading scholar in the areas of restorative and youth justice. He has been researching and writing in the areas of restorative justice, youthful offending and recidivism for the past several years. He has completed several quantitative and qualitative projects on the effects of restorative justice interventions on youthful offending. experts.griffith.edu.au/8295-hennessey-hayesRestorative justice (RJ) processes in Australia largely take the form of facilitated meetings that bring together young offenders and their victims in a respectful conversation about the offence and its impact. As such, restorative justice conference processes draw heavily on the oral language skills of young offenders, such that they are able to effectively communicate not only factual accounts of their offending behaviour, but also various emotional states they experienced before, during and after the offending occurred. Prior research on the oral language skills of young offenders indicates that a substantial proportion have significant language deficits that can impact their ability to effectively communicate emotion during conference encounters. This presentation draws on observational and interview data from a number of young offenders who participated in a restorative justice conference with the aim of better understanding how RJ is linked to reoffending and other outcomes.
Laura MooimanNetherlandsSchoolsAn American based in The Netherlands, Laura is an international educational consultant specializing in school culture, safety, and student behavior. Most recently she was the Project Director for the Wellness Program and PBIS at Napa Valley Unified School District for 10 years where all 30 schools in the district achieved the highest school climate scores in the state after implementing Restorative Practices and PBIS. www.lauramooiman.com/aboutIntegrating Restorative Practices and Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS): How to Create Safe, Positive, and Restorative School Culture That Stustains
Laura will share lessons learned in her 10 years implementing PBIS and Restorative Practices in all 30 Napa Valley schools which required all schools to build restorative systems to build community, address student behavior and to respond to school and community crises including earthquake, multiple student suicides, Napa wildfires, and student protests. PBIS is foundational to creating systems and structures to prevent problem behavior, make students and staff feel safe, and shift staff mindset toward positive approaches to managing student behavior. Without PBIS schools often do not have the capacity to manage all the restoration that would be required in a reactive mode. Restorative Practices provides tools for staff to create community and work meaningfully with students to repair harm.
Michelle StoweIrelandSchoolsI taught Eng & Span for 16 years and am still a teacher at heart; and now a restorative practitioner, lecturer, trainer, consultant and director of Connect RP. I support organisations and schools eager to realise their potential individually and as a community to grow restorative school communities. I facilitate on-site training and have developed a restorative e-learning platform called, Ubuntu Learning. I am passionate about moving conversations beyond 'behaviour management' and towards growing relational learning communities.RESTORATIVE ME; CONNECT, REFLECT & MODEL My presentation will focus on RP from the perspective of the internal landscape, exploring the concept of leadership as modelling; informing how we think, speak, share, listen, ask and show up, all day every day in our classrooms and beyond! I am passionate about moving conversations in schools beyond ‘behaviour management’ and towards creating restorative classrooms and pedagogy. Connecting to the principles of this philosophy, reflecting on how this informs our own values and teaching practice, and identifying ways to model our values in our everyday teaching. This can be especially necessary in times of challenge when we can armour up. Our workshop seeks to identify success criteria not as conformity ‘do what `I say but I’ll as you nicely’ as sometimes RP can be misidentified as, but instead that I like who I am. My TEDX 2017 offers a taster: https://www.ted.com/talks/michelle_stowe_empathy_the_heart_of_difficult_conversations?utm_campaign=tedspread&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tedcomshare
Carmen Estela Morales CancholaMexicoSchools
Legal and judicial
Mi nombre es Carmen Estela Morales Canchola, actualmente trabajo en la junta local de conciliación y arbitraje del estado de Michoacán, tengo 19 años de servicio, estudio quinto año en la facultad de derecho y ciencias sociales, de la umsnh, me apasiona conciliar a las personas.Mi presentación se enfocaría a las personas que han sido víctimas de abuso, trabajar con ambas partes por separado, y hasta que estén listas ambas partes, se podrán conocer. Esto es a grandes rasgos mi presentación. Gracias.
Ikramul HoqueBangladeshAdult justice and prisonsThis is Ikramul Hoque. I'm a Lawyer. My Education backgrounds are Mss in Victimology & Restorative Justice, Mss in Political Science and Bachelor of Laws. I want to practice of Restorative Justice in my Country.Practice of Restorative Justice in prison: Challenges & Opportunities in Bangladesh.
Dr Zulfiya TursunovaGreensboro, NC, USAAcademic
Authors & Creative
Environmental justice
I am an Assistant Professor and a Chairperson in the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies at Guilford College, North Carolina where I facilitate workshops on restorative justice as part of the Conflict Resolution Resource Center. I facilitated a series of workshops in Europe and North America for community leaders from 45 countries of the world on community-based peacebuilding, transitional justice, reconciliation, immigration and sanctuary spaces, food justice and human rights as countries transition to democracy.The purpose of this presentation is to describe how indigenous social and economic network of gap of rural women in Uzbekistan functions as a collective action for social and economic empowerment since 1991 up to the present, the time when Uzbekistan moved from Soviet centrally planned to a market-oriented economy. These community-building circles create relationship among women and support collective action and mutual responsibility by creating spaces for women’s empowerment, power and knowledge to reorganize male-dominated gendered space. These peacebuilding practices and structures function for social justice, redistribution of resources, healing, meaning making, voice, knowledge, agency and conflict resolution.
Kelvin UgwuokeNigeriaAdult justice and prisonsMy name is Kelvin Ugwuoke. I am a psychologist and criminologist from Nigeria. I am a Deputy Superintendent of Corrections currently working as a Non-custodial officer under the Nigerian Correctional Service.

I am a also researcher and writer.
My presentation will feature a personal experience working as a Non-custodial officer. I want to share my experiences while mediating between offenders and their victims.

Being that RJ is a new practice in Nigeria, it is pertinent to share how it is being viewed and accepted in Nigeria.
Margot Van SluytmanCanadaAdult justice and prisons
Victim support
Other (add details below
Award-winning justice activist and writer who teaches Global Citizenship, at Centennial College in Toronto, Ontario. Her life’s-work began at age sixteen when her Dad was murdered in an armed-robbery in Toronto in 1978. Since that time, she has been committed to writing, publishing, and lecturing on Sawbonna: a new model of restorative justice, resilience, and empowerment.Why is it that even as restorative justice and restorative processes are offered to victims, as a whole, it is rejected. Common definitions and applications of restorative justice will be presented, explicating how they are used, by whom, and to what end. Sawbonna, a new model of restorative justice, will be explained, situating the explanation in the framework of both restorative and criminal justice, and aligning it with social justice, to reveal how it not only challenges common definitions and processes of restorative justice; but, furthers the important discourse of victims of crime as policy makers, sound academics, story-tellers, who are far more than grief-stricken by-standers in services of justice processes and legal systems.
Prof. Claudia Lizeth VillavicencioMexicoOther (add details belowFacilitadora de procesos familiares, pionera en México en la implementación del círculo de sentencia restaurativo familiar, con magistrados de segunda instancia. Experiencia en la implementación de la Justicia Restaurativa a conflictos familiares, para atender el daño que el conflicto causa en el entorno familiar. He impulsado la intervención de un equipo multidisciplinario en los procesos de restauración familiar, en sede judicial, para la adecuada atención al daño en el contexto familiar. Implementación programas parcial, medianamente y totalmente Restaurativos familiares.El propósito de mi presentación es destacar la importancia de la implementación de la justicia restaurativa en conflictos familiares, para la atención adecuada y necesaria del daño causado en dicho entorno por el propio conflicto familiar, con apego a la filosofía, principios y metodologías de las prácticas restaurativas. Con la justicia restaurativa familiar es posible atender el conflicto desde las causas, desde el fondo, su objetivo no es el consenso va más allá, pretende enmendar el daño que subsiste en el entorno familiar como respuesta a la realidad social, asi cómo el impacto que el conflicto familiar causa en la comunidad. La aplicación de la justicia restaurativa familiar es necesaria para aquellos conflictos donde el daño causa condiciones asimétricas entre las personas y ello no permite atenderlos desde un enfoque de mediación si no bajo el acompañamiento que es posible con la justicia restaurativa familiar con la intervención multidisciplinaria adecuada